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The Right Skills

Lots of love little talent.

Nitch
post 12.Jan.2018, 05:14 PM
Post #1
Joined: 11.Jan.2018

Sooooo,

I love Sweden, I mean I really really love Sweden. I spent two summers in Malmo years ago doing a help exchange. Now I am a little older, married with a new baby, living in the bag of crazy that is the U.S.A. I have pitched the concept of making the move, and the wife is all about it. The only issue is that I have no high value skill sets. I am currently a General Manager in charge of a large dining operation for a major corporation. Which translates simply to that I run restaurants. Sadly there doesn't seem to be any need to import someone all the way from the U.S. to Sweden to have them manage a restaurant.

So my question is, is there any way, path, option, to be able to make the jump from the U.S. to Sweden with my family without a highly desirable skill set? Has any one else had any success or know some other way.

I understand why there are immigration laws and all that, it just is so heart breaking to me that there is a place in the world that fills me with such joy, a place I would 100% buy into, learn the language, raise my kid in the culture, pay the taxes, consume and produce, but because I have the wrong passport or took the wrong career path, it is completely shut off from me.
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Bsmith
post 12.Jan.2018, 05:30 PM
Post #2
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

It can be done but you would help your case immensely if you could speak the language. You most likely will have to adjust your career and lifestyle expectations a bit as well.

I (and my family)moved to Sweden 14 years ago (before all the immigration issues that may have made it harder) and was able to find a job working for a moving company with very rudimentary Swedish. We did have a few advantages...we had enough cash saved to buy a house and have a small amount left over to furnish the house and have a few months of living expenses taken care of, my wife speaks fluent Swedish and was able to get a job commitment prior to our move and we had friends living in the area. All big pluses. In the end, however, living in Sweden wasn't for us, so we were able to sell the house and move back home. Fortunately, I was able to resume my old job.

So, from my experience, it can be done. However, it is not easy. If you do find a way to move to Sweden, make sure you have an exit strategy in case it doesn't meet your expectations.

Best of luck.
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Gjeebes
post 12.Jan.2018, 05:33 PM
Post #3
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

"So my question is, is there any way, path, option, to be able to make the jump from the U.S. to Sweden with my family without a highly desirable skill set?"

In short, no, not really. People with big skill sets can face huge hurdles. Unless you are independently wealthy, I would refrain from such lofty ideas.

I understand why you would want to leave the US behind, but Sweden is not your answer.

"...a place I would 100% buy into..."

This statement makes me cringe. Either you have little idea of what the realities are, in Meatballia, or you are just terribly misinformed.

Avoid Sweden like the plague.
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mjennin2
post 12.Jan.2018, 06:11 PM
Post #4
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 8.Mar.2010

1. As to Gjeebes' last sentence, I would recommend you avoid his posts like the plague rolleyes.gif

2. Along with what bsmith said, I recommend you become fully fluent in Swedish before you move. Get your wife on board too. Hire a tutor to speed up the process. If you're that set on moving, do the most important leg work now by channeling your feelings about the US into achieving fluency.

3. Look for jobs in the hospitality sector. Hotel chains are always looking for management in your skill set. Schools cook all their food in-house so you could look for public jobs in that sector, if they arise. You can even talk to a private head hunting firm in Sweden to get an idea of the labor market and what areas you could focus on for job opportunities.

At the end of the day, you must learn Swedish before moving. If you don't have an in demand or complex skill set (like IT or the like) or a Swedish partner already established here, you'll be swimming upstream big time without command of the language first. Everything else will fall into place smile.gif
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Gjeebes
post 12.Jan.2018, 06:27 PM
Post #5
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

Men-jiji, menjiji, men-jiji menjiji...

"Everything else will fall into place"

Bahahahahahaa! Nice one!
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mjennin2
post 12.Jan.2018, 06:53 PM
Post #6
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 8.Mar.2010

QUOTE (Gjeebes @ 12.Jan.2018, 06:27 PM) *
Men-jiji, menjiji, men-jiji menjiji.... "Everything else will fall into place". Bahahahahahaa! Nice one!


Your incessant negativity needs to be balanced out. Just because your life in Sweden wasn't a success doesn't mean other peoples' lives won't be (or, as it seems that you would like, *shouldn't* be).

I've had an extremely positive experience in this country, despite going through the same rites of passage as any other immigrant in pretty much any western world. I even did so going through the throes of postpartum depression. And you know what? It all fell into place just as to be expected.

The problem is that you either had the wrong expectations coming to Sweden, or you're just a generally sour person that will struggle no matter where you are.

Either way, it is what it is. If OP becomes fluent in Swedish prior to moving and obtains a job in order to get a residence permit, 85% of the troubles of being an immigrant in a foreign country are solved. I'd say the other 14.99% of his problem will be studying for a driving license, and the other 0.001% will be the fact that the clossst Chipotle to this country is in Frankfurt. But that 15% is simply based on my own personal assessment wink.gif
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Gjeebes
post 12.Jan.2018, 07:13 PM
Post #7
Joined: 20.Feb.2012

"The problem is that you either had the wrong expectations coming to Sweden, or you're just a generally sour person that will struggle no matter where you are."

And it is because of statements like this that I tend to think of you as a rose-tinted-glass encrusted simpleton.

A fluff-cake.

I eat people like you, for fika.

My little pinky has achieved and experienced more in life, than two of you, ever could.

You simply have "no idea".

I have done quite fine in Sweden, my deary. I have independently produced, much much more than any of my "competitors" in my current milieu, even with their hands constantly held, and being pampered beyond reason.

I don't "struggle". I work, very hard, and then I play, very hard.

And I never, ever, settle for second rate.

Sweden is the 6th country I have lived in. And it will remain at the bottom of the list.

Bye for now, sweetie.


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mjennin2
post 12.Jan.2018, 08:04 PM
Post #8
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 8.Mar.2010

I'm going to put this in the simplest terms I can manage:

There are two types of people in this world. Those who live satisfying, happy, successful lives who wish to encourage and build others up to reach the same state in life, or those who are utterly sour on the inside and so embittered with their lives that they wish only to discourage and tear others down. And then try to cover their tracks with inflated and unasked for self-proclamations.

If you were any part of the former, you'd be like bsmith. You'd be honest about your experiences with Sweden not being what you hoped it would be for you, but you'd offer fair advice that the OP was seeking. Or you'd be content enough with your daily life that you'd actually be living it, instead of spewing depression all day long on an Internet forum.

*shrugs*
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Bsmith
post 12.Jan.2018, 08:12 PM
Post #9
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

Thanks, mjennin, but sometimes I'm the other guy, too.

Just being honest.
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mjennin2
post 12.Jan.2018, 08:17 PM
Post #10
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 8.Mar.2010

QUOTE (Bsmith @ 12.Jan.2018, 08:12 PM) *
sometimes

^^That word means all the difference in this situation.
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ChocOwl
post 12.Jan.2018, 08:30 PM
Post #11
Joined: 17.Jan.2011

QUOTE (mjennin2 @ 12.Jan.2018, 06:53 PM) *
Your incessant negativity needs to be balanced out. Just because your life in Sweden wasn't a success doesn't mean other peoples' lives won't be (or, as it see ... (show full quote)

+1
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 12.Jan.2018, 08:43 PM
Post #12
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

Again, an old reminder...Don't feed the troll...
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mjennin2
post 12.Jan.2018, 08:57 PM
Post #13
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 8.Mar.2010

QUOTE (Gamla Hälsingebock @ 12.Jan.2018, 08:43 PM) *
Again, an old reminder...Don't feed the troll...

Sometimes I can't help but remind myself that, troll or not, that is an actual human being spending their actual wakeful time sharing their shambles life all day long to any person who accidentally reads it. And for all the different characters who read and participate on this forum, I have to think there are more people like me seeking actual help, useful advice, and maybe just a little goodwill in their request for guidance. Sometimes I can't resist the urge to reconcile the massive gap between the two.
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Bsmith
post 12.Jan.2018, 10:40 PM
Post #14
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

Back to the OP, if moving to Sweden is too big of a jump, perhaps there are other places in the US that the OP and his family could relocate to. If, say, the OP is living now in in some big metropolis like LA or NYC then moving to a smaller to medium sized town in the Midwest may be the answer. Many Swedes migrated to Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan because it reminded them of home. Just a thought.
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Gamla Hälsingebock
post 13.Jan.2018, 03:38 AM
Post #15
Joined: 21.Dec.2006

Many of my family(1890/1900's) went to America to earn money and then went home with it...

America was then and is now an opportunistic country...If you can't be comfortable here then the chance of success elsewhere is dubious...

Why leave the "promised land" for the unknown???

Vacations in Sweden are great and totally enjoyable, especially if you have a lot dollars earned at home...
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