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Difference between residency and citizenship?

Not the obvious ones.

Qlt82
post 30.Apr.2019, 04:42 PM
Post #1
Joined: 30.Apr.2019

Hi Guys. I have hard time to find answer to this simple question: What is a difference between permanent residency and a citizenship? What rights and obligations will I have as a citizen that I do not have as a permanent resident from UE country?
Let me start with the obvious:
• Voting in EU and Parliament elections
• Mandatory military service
Most of the websites focus on the thigs you gain with citizenship. But what are a duties obligations of a citizen in Sweden? What will be different for resident? Are there any differences regarding taxes – income, house tax abroad, capital gain tax and such? Are there any other legal responsibilities as citizen when if (in the distant future) I decide to leave Sweden? What about my inheritance abroad and with inheritance after me? What are the issues of holding two UE passports? I know this is vague but I have hard time to predict what can be affected by such step.
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skogsbo
post 30.Apr.2019, 06:05 PM
Post #2
Joined: 20.Sep.2011

If you can keep your original nationality. There are no disadvantages.

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yet another brit
post 30.Apr.2019, 06:17 PM
Post #3
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

Only citizens can vote in parliamentary elections. EU citizens vote at the EU level in their country of residence, or if dual EU citizens, get to choose which country.

Taxation is a function of residence, not citizenship.

Military service - in theory and in wartime a citizen can be called up, but I wouldn't lose any sleep over the possibility. If you are in the call-up window (18-19 years old, so unlikely) you would be liable for assessment at a low probability of being called up involuntarily, and of course any children would get that obligation too.

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TheExpatEagle
post 30.Apr.2019, 07:08 PM
Post #4
Location: Skåne
Joined: 23.Aug.2016

QUOTE (yet another brit @ 30.Apr.2019, 06:17 PM) *
Only citizens can vote in parliamentary elections. EU citizens vote at the EU level in their country of residence, or if dual EU citizens, get to choose which country.Taxation ... (show full quote)


If you are a citizen and you get into trouble the embassy of your home country won't help you.

If you are a citizen you can get study loans and study outside of the country.

If you are a citizen you can work in security clearance jobs such as airports, police, security guards, etc.

Unofficially you get treated differently by government organisations.
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Mib
post 3.May.2019, 11:52 AM
Post #5
Joined: 7.Jul.2006

I guess that unless you have dual nationality, then you can't be deported, whereas Residency is only a right to stay while you obey the laws/rules. Even as an EU citizen, which has automatic residency rights in member countried, any member can request that you return to your home country if you don't find work within a certain period, but the rules of course vary between countries.

For me, Swedish citixenship allows me to freely move within the EU should Brexit ever happen back in my home country UK. That was the main reason for applying.
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TheExpatEagle
post 3.May.2019, 07:15 PM
Post #6
Location: Skåne
Joined: 23.Aug.2016

QUOTE (Mib @ 3.May.2019, 11:52 AM) *
I guess that unless you have dual nationality, then you can't be deported, whereas Residency is only a right to stay while you obey the laws/rules. Even as an EU citizen, ... (show full quote)


If you have dual nationality you can be deported, under certain circumstances such as committing certain crimes.

Plenty of people have been deported back to their 'home' country even with dual nationality. Such as the person deported from Australia to Sweden after 23 odd years because they did some crime. They were only born in Sweden and left aged 2. This has happened in reverse too.

The only way to prevent that is to give up your British nationality but even then as you are born in the UK and not in Sweden then you always have that risk.
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cootje1976
post 15.May.2019, 02:55 PM
Post #7
Location: Uppsala county
Joined: 3.May.2012

If coming from another EU country, unless it is dire I would absolutely not change the citizenship to Swedish; as long as you are a EU citizen there should no problem. I for instance was on my way to get the Swedish nationality (I am Dutch!), and then I cancelled it because putting the 2 countries constitutions next to one another, I have more liberties as a Dutch citizen than a Swede by default. That more or less did it for me.

One of the things is; my body is my temple, and I can do with it whatever I please, as long as other people and society do not pick up the tap afterwards. The government has no legal authority over what I want to do with my body, and what goes in it as long as I am not hurting others.

Here, well... yeah.. it is a society of conformity, and that is about it. Can be nice, but I need my at least once a year wekks worth binge of weed in the Netherlands to cope with it for another year. Yeah, that is legal there too; when it comes to that Sweden is really still in the stone age; also regarding some other issues like euthanasia (partially legal here but nearly every doctor will oppose it), etc.

So in the end it is up to you.
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Essingen55
post 15.May.2019, 03:44 PM
Post #8
Joined: 12.Dec.2013

QUOTE
Are there any differences regarding taxes


There may be. You would need to study the double taxation agreement between Sweden and your own country.
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cootje1976
post 15.May.2019, 09:04 PM
Post #9
Location: Uppsala county
Joined: 3.May.2012

QUOTE (Essingen55 @ 15.May.2019, 03:44 PM) *
There may be. You would need to study the double taxation agreement between Sweden and your own country.


Errrr.. Wrong. Within the EU there is no double taxation. It is against the free movement of people and goods. Since the topic starter is from another EU member country, double taxes are out of the question.
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Saywhatwhat
post 16.May.2019, 09:34 AM
Post #10
Joined: 15.Feb.2018

QUOTE (cootje1976 @ 15.May.2019, 03:55 PM) *
If coming from another EU country, unless it is dire I would absolutely not change the citizenship to Swedish; as long as you are a EU citizen there should no problem. I for i ... (show full quote)


Coochie, that how you pronounce it? With a hard “e”? Silly.

If you don’t mind me asking... why are you in Sweden and not living in the countryside of the Netherlands? You have expressed your enjoyment of nature in Sweden... but other than that, seems like you prefer the mentality, policies, and personal freedoms of the Dutch better.

Because just by living in Sweden, not being a citizen, your personal freedoms are restricted.
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cootje1976
post 16.May.2019, 09:52 AM
Post #11
Location: Uppsala county
Joined: 3.May.2012

QUOTE (Saywhatwhat @ 16.May.2019, 09:34 AM) *
Coochie, that how you pronounce it? With a hard “e”? Silly.If you don’t mind me asking... why are you in Sweden and not living in the countryside of the Netherlands? You ... (show full quote)


Reasons for coming here:

Population density; too many people in the Netherlands, and the Dutch countryside is... not as nice as where I live now, plus the cost of that type of property we have here in the Netherlands would be close to at least 2 million Euro's. I do like the nature here, but I am a misantrope, so I generally do not like to be around 2 many people. That is why we live 'out in the woods'.
Yes in part in Sweden your personal freedoms are very restricted; but if you do not deal with Swedish people on a daily basis and live amongst foreigners (Mostly other non Swedes out there and we do our OWN thing!), live is very bearable. Is kind of a neath area where Swedish people moved to Stockholm, and foreigners that came to live in this area.

So actual foreign beer and booze (holiday times most people go back to their home countries and come back with actual grade-A booze that you just get at the figgin' SUPERMARKET!, I actually never had to go to Systembolaget; most people when coming back have their rear bumper scraping because of all the booze in the vehicles!).

Don't get me wrong, I do connect with some Swedes and work with them on a daily basis, and they can be awesome individuals. But their customs are convoluted sometimes, so I never hang out privately with Swedes; then I prefer my Finnish neighbour for that matter; getting shitfaced and then straggling home.

So I try and have managed not to let the restrictions of Swedish society hamper me. I live my life the way I want and according to my frame of mind and trying not to hurt others. I reckon by not being a citizen, I will be able to retain my freedoms when I decide to go back home one day. Until that time, I will ride this shit out until the wheels fall off!
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Essingen55
post 16.May.2019, 03:08 PM
Post #12
Joined: 12.Dec.2013

QUOTE (cootje1976 @ 15.May.2019, 09:04 PM) *
Errrr.. Wrong. Within the EU there is no double taxation. It is against the free movement of people and goods. Since the topic starter is from another EU member country, doubl ... (show full quote)


No...you are wrong.

The fact of the matter is that although double taxation agreements seek to avoid people being taxed twice, there are some differences in where tax is taken on different sources of income, depending on nationality. This was the original question


For example, here is one such double taxation agreement...

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/...en-tax-treaties

2015 Sweden-UK Double Taxation Convention - in force

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