A voice for newcomers in Sweden

Careers: How to work as a teacher in Sweden

Sweden needs more teachers, so will you be one of them? Photo: Jonas Ekströmer/TT

Published: 12.Mar.2018 16:27 hrs

Sweden has a shortage of teachers, making it an attractive option for education professionals looking to move overseas. But it's one of Sweden's regulated jobs, meaning extra hurdles and red tape for job-seekers. Here's what you need to know about finding work as a teacher in Sweden.

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Teachers, particularly those in certain areas such as primary education, science and maths, are among the professionals most likely to have a job in five years' time, a report on the most 'future-proof' jobs late last year from the Swedish Confederation of Professional Associations (Saco) showed. Another investigation by broadcaster SVT revealed that there's a severe shortage of qualified teachers in Sweden, particularly in more rural areas.

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