A voice for newcomers in Sweden

Sweden and Denmark in refugee war of words

Refugees wait at Malmö station in southern Sweden after crossing the border from Denmark. Photo: Ola Torkelsson/TT

Published: 06.Nov.2015 11:45 hrs

UPDATED: Sweden’s declaration that it can no longer guarantee refugees a roof over their heads has sparked a back-and-forth debate between Danish and Swedish ministers.

With Sweden struggling to provide enough beds for the record number of refugees crossing into the country, the country’s migration minister on Thursday urged asylum seekers travelling from Germany or Denmark that they would not be guaranteed a safe place to sleep.
 
"The urgent problem today is that the number of asylum seekers is increasing faster than the number of accommodation places. Sweden today can no longer guarantee accommodation places," said Morgan Johansson at a press conference.
 
"Those coming to our borders may well be greeted by the news that we can not arrange accommodation. They may then decide to either arrange accommodation on their own or go back to Germany or Denmark," he said.
 
Johansson’s comments did not go unnoticed in Denmark, where politicians have actively tried to keep the number of refugees down in contrast to Sweden’s more open policy.
 
Danish Integration Minister Inger Støjberg reacted on Thursday evening by calling Johansson’s comment “neither good nor appropriate”.
 
“Sweden put itself in the situation it is in by carrying out extremely gentle immigration policies in every way. It’s not a solution to start guiding refugees to other countries. One can hope that the Swedes are beginning to take a more realistic approach to the situation,” he told Jyllands-Posten. 
 
Støjberg rejected the notion that Denmark had essentially fuelled the influx of refugees to Sweden by letting them travel unhindered on the way to Sweden, rather than authorities registering them as they are supposed to under the EU's Dublin regulations.
 
“I know that Finland is receiving many asylum seekers who have travelled through Sweden. So the Swedish and the Danish way of registering asylum seekers are completely the same to my knowledge,” she said. 
 
Støjberg went on to echo Danish Foreign Minister Kristian Jensen in saying that Denmark will not take any refugees from Sweden.
 
"I don't see us taking any of the Swedish asylum seekers," she said. 
 
Jensen said on Thursday that the only help Denmark would offer its Swedish neighbours was inspiration from its more hard-line approach to immigration.
 
 
“Every country has chosen its own course within the refugee area. They have chosen theirs and now they must deal with it as they’d wish,” Jensen told TV2 News. 
 
“We know that there are some countries that are looking to Denmark and we know that Sweden has also looked to Denmark to find inspiration. That is probably the best help we can give them,” Jensen said. 
 
Jensen’s Swedish counterpart Margot Wallström responded by saying Sweden "had done the most per capita in the EU and we have nothing to be ashamed of" and added that decisions wouldn't be "based on Danish politics".
 
But Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson reiterated Migration Minister Morgan Johansson's comments on Friday morning, suggesting that it was perhaps "safer" for refugees to stay in Denmark or Germany if they had somewhere to stay rather than "come to Sweden and risk not getting a roof over your head".
 
Sweden, with a population of 9.8 million, is expecting to receive up to 190,000 asylum seekers this year. By contrast, Denmark, a country of 5.6 million, believes it will receive 20,000.
 
While the government in Stockholm has offered permanent residency to everyone fleeing Syria's civil war, Denmark's government has sought to limit the number of refugees by issuing temporary residence permitsdelaying family reunifications and slashing benefits for asylum seekers.
 
It has also placed adverts in Lebanese newspapers to discourage migrants from choosing Denmark. Sweden’s anti-immigration Sweden Democrat party has been inspired by Denmark's campaign to do the same, as has the Norwegian government

More Stories

Anas Awad with his "Swedish family" told his story to The Local Voices

Sharing the best of The Local Voices

We told a lot of great stories in 2016. Did you get to read and share them all? READ
Malmö Mayor Katrin Stjernfeldt Jammeh has beaten off a post-election challenge from the local Moderate leader Torbjörn Tegnhammar, after the Centre and Liberal Parties abstained. READ
The speaker of Sweden's parliament has asked incumbent Prime Minister Stefan Löfven to try to form a government, after his centre-right rival Ulf Kristersson failed in his attempts. READ
Photo: Erik Gerhardsson

'History will record how everyone reacted to the Syrian tragedy'

Erik, a 21-year-old Swedish volunteer, reflects on his experience helping refugees in Sweden and abroad. READ
When Malmö's Örtagårdsskolan was built in 1970, the idea was that it would draw pupils both from the newly built Rosengård district to the north, and from the middle-class area of detached houses to the south. READ
Between today and early next year, anyone in possession of hand grenades or illegal pyrotechnical equipment can hand them over to police without risking punishment. READ
Indian-born Deepak Kamboj came to Sweden for work and started his music career as a hobby. Now he works for SAS and has a record label that has been shortlisted on Spotify's Top 50. READ

This Iranian teaches Swedish online to 10,000 followers

"I’m exporting Swedish to my homeland." READ