A voice for newcomers in Sweden

Let police use CCTV without a permit: Sweden

File photo of a surveillance camera. Photo: Bezav Mahmod/SvD/TT

Published: 15.Jun.2017 07:33 hrs

Police should be able to use CCTV without having to apply for a licence, the Swedish government has said, ahead of the presentation of a new inquiry on camera surveillance.

Prime Minister Stefan Löfven made the announcement during a parliamentary debate on Wednesday, and Justice Minister Morgan Johansson echoed his words to the media later. It came ahead of the presentation of a new report, which is not expected to touch on the measure.

“It will be easier with camera surveillance. When it comes to the question of the police being obligated to get permission the inquiry had not been asked to answer that,” he told the TT newswire.

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