A voice for newcomers in Sweden

Swede mistakenly declared dead after personal number mishap

Letters from the bank rarely carry good news, but this one was worse than most. Photo. Pontus Lundahl/TT

Published: 06.Dec.2018 08:30 hrs

A 47-year-old Swedish woman had to prove she was still alive after a tax agency typo led authorities to believe she was dead.

The woman's bureaucratic ordeal began in June when she received a mysterious letter from the bank implying that she had died. They had not just sent it to the wrong person: a phone call later she found out that she had been declared dead by the tax agency Skatteverket six days earlier.

An apologetic Skatteverket administrative officer explained that they had accidentally put some of the figures in someone else's personal ID number (personnummer) – the ubiquitous ten-digit number used to identify people in Sweden – in the wrong order, thus mistakenly pronouncing the woman deceased.

Read full article on The Local

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