A voice for newcomers in Sweden

Feeling like a foreigner at home – the strange nature of dual nationality

A stranger here, a stranger there? Photo: JonatanStålhös/imagebank.sweden.se

Published: 18.Jan.2018 07:59 hrs

What's it like to be a stranger in your own country? Freelance writer Caroline Adolfsson interviews four Swedish nationals who didn't grow up in Sweden.

Swedes born abroad, or those with citizenship rights or maybe even dual citizens, are a specific subset of the migrant population here in Sweden.

As a dual citizen myself, American/Swedish, I can personally attest to the weird bureaucratic and personal challenges of migrating to a country you're already a citizen of. For example, I paid almost $200 for my passport from the Swedish embassy in New York City, only to arrive in Sweden and realize it had been issued with my non-registered tax ID number and not my personal number. The passport was invalid upon my arrival in Sweden and I had to pay to get a new one.

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