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Swedish university launches digital archive of Nazi concentration camp survivor testimonies

The Swedish buses that brought liberated concentration camp prisoners to Sweden. Photo: Scanpix Sweden/TT

Published: 18.Oct.2017 16:56 hrs

A digital archive of over 500 survivors’ testimonies from a Nazi concentration camp will be launched in the southern Swedish city of Lund later this week.

The archive includes interviews with women and children who were interned at the Ravensbrück camp in northern Germany, as well as documents belonging to survivors and Nazi officials. 

The interviews were conducted "with the purpose of informing coming generations what had taken place," said historian Paul Rudny in the presentation of the archive.

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