• Sweden edition
 

Court gives access to Swedish Stasi archives

Published: 24 Jun 2010 16:27 GMT+02:00
Updated: 24 Jun 2010 16:27 GMT+02:00

The Supreme Administrative Court ruled on Friday that Professor Birgitta Almgren, a professor in German at Södertörn University (Södertörns Högskola), should be allowed to see the documents, which are held by the Swedish Security Service (Säpo). Säpo has consistently opposed releasing the material.

Almgren will not be given access to all documents, however. The court itself will decide exactly which papers she will be able to read. She will also not be allowed to take the documents off Säpo premises, will not be permitted to make copies of the documents and will have to destroy her notes within a year.

It is believed that most of the files she will access come from the Swedish parts of the Rosenholz Files. These were top secret Stasi documents, containing names of foreign agents and details of their activities. Most of the agents were active in West Germany.

The Rosenholz Files ended up in CIA hands in unclear circumstances following the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

Almgren last year published a book about Swedish relations with East Germany’s communist dictatorship. In it, she describes the very close relationship between Social Democratic politician Stellan Arvidson and his wife Britta, and their admiration for the country’s totalitarian regime.

TT/The Local (news@thelocal.se)

Your comments about this article

17:32 June 24, 2010 by rufus.t.firefly
What is it about SD's that so many of them have admired totalitarianism, both left and right? It is always good to lift the carpet and shine a light on the roaches.

I wonder why Birgitta Almgren's access is so limited. Why should the court decide? Wait, I know, national security! These are old files from a defunct nation. They cannot compromise anything relevant to present security. What they can compromise are those whose names appear in them, and rightly so.

I guess I should also say that the Moderates also have a thing about totalitarians, but only the right variety. I guess that makes the SD's more equal opportunity sycophants.
18:29 June 24, 2010 by The Nine
I am sure THF will be on the case.
18:32 June 24, 2010 by tadchem
WWII ended 65 years ago, but we are still sweeping old war criminals out of the cracks in the woodwork, mostly due to captured documents. One must wonder who is trying to protect whom, and why, by keeping these 21-year old documents out of the daylight.
19:48 June 24, 2010 by Nemesis
Anyone who has worked for the Stasi in any capacity should be publicly named.

The entire archive of Stasi people, should be made public and posted on the internet for all to see.
20:10 June 24, 2010 by Jimmy
Why the opposition in disclosing these documents you ask? Think a bit the Swedish government at the time was probably involved in assisting their old ally.

Don't want the facts to come out because then they would have to admit they were/are not as innocent or righteous as they have/do preach now a days
20:59 June 24, 2010 by Nemesis
@ Jimmy

The simple reason is this.

So many of the people who were involved in late 60's disturbances, went on to become stodges for the Stasis, then later became civil servants in Sweden, it is embarrassing.

Most of theose people are now at the top of the civil service, making major management decisions.

There is even some idiots who moved to East Germany, became Stasi spies and came back telling everyone how wonderful they thought East Germany was. The east Germans being treated like dirt and used as slave labour did not seem to register with them. Some of them are now senior civil servants as well.

I look forward to reading the list of names when it is released.
00:55 June 25, 2010 by kzjh72
This reminds me of a couple of incidents during the 70-ies. At that time I was a young, outspoken opponent against the Swedish left's admiration of all Communist dictators around the world. On a couple of occasions I was photographed and threatened by Swedes openly saying that I will be registered and could expect problems in the future. When visiting Poland a couple of years later I was harassed by the customs both on my way in and out of the country. On my way out I was detained without explanation and released just after my ferry back to Sweden already had left. No reason was given, but I noticed that the custom officials checked my passport against a printed list of names before the harassment started.
01:04 June 25, 2010 by Swedesmith
Publish the names then each offender should be tarred and feathered and sent to Instanbul.
09:47 June 25, 2010 by Nemesis
@ kzjh72

Yup, you got it.

Just think you might find out which Swede was responsible for that and maybe you can sue the culprit responsible. Hopefully the Swedish courts would throw the case out and you could take it to the European Court of Justice and get a god settlement.

@ Swedesmith

I hope all there names are released, without exception. A no fly list would be a good place to start:)
14:37 June 25, 2010 by Audrian
Any person who spies for another foreign country has broken his/her country's law; this applies spying for the US or UK, for example. Contrary to the claim above, admiring a communist East Germany is not a crime. In East Germany all children had a decent standard of living, better than children in a low income bracket in UK and the US today, where such children suffer from lack of adequate food and nutrition. GDR's GDP per capita was comparable with Britain's just before Mrs Thatcher took power.

East Germany today is economically depressed area of Germany. The standard of living of the majority declined dramatically and has not recovered since the wall fell down. Government's faulty policy and Germany suffered from it over 20 years. The young from East Germany migrated to better their lives, but did not make lots of money, as the propaganda had made them believe before the fall of the Berlin wall. Out of East Germans only one woman, the present Chancellor, made it all the way to the top of government job. She was the daughter of a priest in East Germany.

There are things that one might not like in a communist states. There are also good parts. The Social democrates might have adminred the good parts. There is nothing wrong with it.
18:13 June 25, 2010 by Nemesis
@ Audrian

I was talking about those from Sweden who made a point of working for the Stasi, knowing full well that ordinary Germans were suffering at the hands of the Stasi.

As for your nonsense that all children and adults in East Germany had a descent standard of living. That is complete nonsense.

East Germany was noting more than a concentration camp for a large proportion of the German population in Europe.

The sooner every Stasi member, supporter, employee and sympathiser of the Stasi's name is made public, the better. The sooner we can start removing them from positions were they can do damage to our soceities, assuming they have not already.
19:15 June 25, 2010 by Audrian
@Nemesis

I have never been a fan of East Germany. What I was telling is based on hard economic statistics. If you have time, try to have a look at UN or OECD statistics covering the specified date and you will have a glimpse of what I was saying. Propaganda or echoing cold-war propaganda is not scientific information; it is repeating CIA misinformation meant to discredit the enemy. In a discussion board like this we have to be honest and stick to the facts. If we do this we will learn rather spread confusion.

I call upon you to tell me your source of information that will discredit what I identified. If your data is authentic and shows that I have misread the statistics I will stand to be corrected. If you repeat the same claim in one form or the other I will ignore them because the discussion will not have any merit..
20:16 June 25, 2010 by Nemesis
@ Audrian

Speak to someone from East Germany.

They will put you right.
15:34 June 26, 2010 by USA Is Number 1
Persons acting as foreign agents in their own country deserve to be outed, whether acting on behalf of totalitarian regimes or not. Besides agents for Communist East Germany, there were also Swedes acting as agents for the US, UK as well as various military regimes around the world at the time.

Let the sun shine on all of it.
17:09 June 26, 2010 by Nemesis
@ USA Is Number 1

100% right.

Out them all.
01:45 June 28, 2010 by kzjh72
@Audrian

I'm not sure if you are referring to me as claiming that admiring a communist East Germany is a crime. If that's the case then you misunderstood me (read my post again). My point was that I didn't like being threatened and registered for not admiring East Germany myself. The discussion in regards to how good or bad things was in former Eastern Europe is a different one, where I (by the way) are much less critical against the East now days then when I was young.
Today's headlines
National
Pupils find killer's rifle in Swedish sports lesson
The location of the hidden weapon. Photo: Polisen

Pupils find killer's rifle in Swedish sports lesson

Three teenage schoolgirls from southern Sweden were left gobsmacked after finding an AK-47 Kalashnikov that belonged to a convicted murderer, during a physical education class. READ  

International
'Non-existent' EU cooperation on refugees
Refugees in Lampedusa, Italy in 2013. Photo: TT

'Non-existent' EU cooperation on refugees

Sweden's EU commissioner Cecilia Malmström has criticized European Union countries for a lack of solidarity when it comes to taking in refugees. READ  

Politics
Stefan Löfven voted in as new Prime Minister
Social Democrat leader Stefan Löfven. Photo: TT

Stefan Löfven voted in as new Prime Minister

Social Democrat leader Stefan Löfven has been voted in as the new Prime Minister of Sweden. READ  

Politics
Reinfeldt's top team hold last meeting
Fredrik Reinfeldt is exiting Sweden's political stage. Photo: TT

Reinfeldt's top team hold last meeting

Sweden's outgoing centre-right cabinet have gathered for their last meeting, as Social Democrat leader Stefan Löfven prepares to take over as Prime Minister. READ  

Interview
Geena Davis: 'I want to be in a Swedish movie'
Geena Davis. Photo: AP

Geena Davis: 'I want to be in a Swedish movie'

Oscar-winning Hollywood actress Geena Davis was an exchange student in Sweden in the seventies and was once engaged to a Swede. She chatted to the The Local's Natalia Brzezinski about how she'd love to star in a Swedish movie. READ  

Politics
Löfven in U-turn over restaurant sales tax hike
Social Democrat leader Stefan Löfven. Photo: TT

Löfven in U-turn over restaurant sales tax hike

Incoming Prime Minister Stefan Löfven won't be increasing taxes in restaurants as promised, despite his strong criticism of the former government's tax cuts in 2012. READ  

Lifestyle
What's On in Sweden: October 2nd - 9th
The Weeping is one of the works on sale this weekend. Photo: Stockholm's Affordable Art Fair

What's On in Sweden: October 2nd - 9th

Stockholm's Affordable Art Fair returns, British rocker Midge Ure is in Malmö and one of Gothenburg's most creative spaces is hosting a ten year anniversary party. READ  

Sport
Malmö beat Olympiacos in Champions clash
Rosenberg celebrates his second goal. Photo: TT

Malmö beat Olympiacos in Champions clash

Malmö became the first Swedish side to win a Champions League match in 14 years after beating Olympiacos 2-0 on Wednesday night. READ  

Education
Three Swedish unis in world's top 100
One of the buildings at the Karolinska Institute. Photo: TT

Three Swedish unis in world's top 100

Three Swedish universities were ranked among the top 100 in the world in the new Times Higher Education ranking, with another two featured in the top 200. READ  

What's next on Sweden's political stage?
Social Democrat leader Stefan Löfven. Photo: TT

What's next on Sweden's political stage?

Upcoming Prime Minister Stefan Löfven announced his new Red-Green coalition government on Friday, but what happens next? Here are all the important dates you need to know. READ  

RECEIVE OUR NEWSLETTER AND ALERTS
Sponsored Article
Try out your very own office in Stockholm - for free
Gallery
Stefan Löfven through the years
Gallery
People-watching: October 1st
Analysis
Should Sweden's school age be raised?
National
Top Swedish skier killed in Chile avalanche
Blog updates

01 October

Academy-Award Winning Actor Geena Davis on Changing the Way We View Women in Media (Stockholm in my American Heart) »

"There are two moments in Geena Davis’s life that molded her into the powerful women’s advocate and founder of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media she is today: living in Sweden and starring in Thelma & Louise. The first part of her personal journey took flight in Sandviken, a small rocky town north of..." READ »

 

01 October

Future tense – ska or kommer att? (The Swedish Teacher) »

"Hej igen! Karen had a question the following question on that about future tense: Explain when you use “komma att ” and “ska”. I’m running along forever here using “ska” and realize suddenly everyone uses “komma att” this and that all the time! In Swedish there are three different ways to express future tense and they are not..." READ »

 
 
 
National
JohannaN: Jewellery inspired by northern Sweden
National
Apology for Swedish model's stolen photos
Politics
New coalition agrees on defence and migration
Fastighetsbyrån
Gallery
Property of the week: Botkyrka
Education
New government to make school compulsory to 18
Politics
Sweden Democrat wins Deputy Speaker spot
National
Swedish scientists sneak Bob Dylan lyrics into articles
Lifestyle
The five best Swedish songs of the month
Gallery
People-watching: September 28th
National
When Italian style meets Swedish simplicity
Lifestyle
Review: Sweden's first alcohol-free nightclub
Gallery
In Pictures: The MS Estonia disaster
Lifestyle
Ten things expat women notice in Sweden
Politics
What's next on Sweden's political stage?
Gallery
Sweden's 2014 election: Most memorable moments
Society
What's on in Sweden
Gallery
People-watching: September 24th
Seaman Oliver Gee with his first lobster
Lifestyle
How to catch the first lobster of the year
Gallery
In Pictures: Fredrik Reinfeldt through the years.
Sponsored Article
How to start a business in Stockholm
Latest news from The Local in Austria

More news from Austria at thelocal.at

Latest news from The Local in Switzerland

More news from Switzerland at thelocal.ch

Latest news from The Local in Germany

More news from Germany at thelocal.de

Latest news from The Local in Denmark

More news from Denmark at thelocal.dk

Latest news from The Local in Spain

More news from Spain at thelocal.es

Latest news from The Local in France

More news from France at thelocal.fr

Latest news from The Local in Italy

More news from Italy at thelocal.it

Latest news from The Local in Norway

More news from Norway at thelocal.no

865
jobs available
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions is an innovative business company which provides valuable assistance with the Swedish Authorities, Swedish language practice and general communications. Call 073-100 47 81 or visit:
www.swedishdowntown.com
PSD Media
PSD Media is marketing company that offers innovative solutions for online retailers. We provide modern solutions that help increase traffic and raise conversion. Visit our site at:
http://psdmedia.se
If you want to drink, that’s your business.
If you want to stop, we can help.

Learn more about English-language Alcoholics Anonymous in Sweden. No dues. No fees. Confidentiality assured.
AA-EUROPE.ORG/SWEDEN