• Sweden edition
 
Three in ten parents 'manhandle' kids: study

Three in ten parents 'manhandle' kids: study

Published: 01 Dec 2011 14:56 GMT+01:00
Updated: 01 Dec 2011 14:56 GMT+01:00

“These figures must be seen as slightly alarming,” said Maria Larsson, minister for children and elderly, to daily Dagens Nyheter.

The survey, carried out by the foundation Allmänna Barnhuset, which works to safeguard children in society, shows that the number of parents handling their children roughly has increased from 12 percent in 2000 to 30 percent in 2011.

Swedish-born parents are more likely to grab or shake their children than parent born outside of Sweden, according to the survey.

Among the Swedish-born parents, the majority of such punishments are carried out by men.

Almost 42 percent of Swedish-born fathers said that they had on occasion used such methods, while 34 percent of Swedish-born women had done the same.

For men born outside of Sweden the corresponding figure was 16.7 percent and women 24 percent.

However, no parents in the survey said they had shaken a child younger than one year old, which the authors of the report saw as a positive sign.

Neither had any child under two years of age been subjected to corporal punishment.

Despite the rise in the general rough handling of children, the study showed no significant changes to parents’ attitudes about corporal punishment.

92 percent of parents in Sweden didn’t think that it was acceptable to beat children.

Men and women from outside of Sweden and parents with a lower level of education were on average more positive to corporal punishment than the others.

The study was carried out by the foundation Allmänna Barnhuset on the behest of the government. Similar studies were carried out in 1980, 2000 and 2006.

TT/The Local/rm (news@thelocal.se)

Your comments about this article

16:11 December 1, 2011 by Migga
I`d love to get my eyes on this study. I bet it`s pure crap. There might be an explanation tho and that is that native Swedes grab and pull their kids while immigrants don`t. They do worse. And so it doesn`t show up in this study.

BRIS came out with a rapport, regarding abuse towards children, in 2011. In that you can read on page 37 that;

"Immigrants beat their children more and worse then native Swedes"

http://www.bris.se/upload/Articles/BRIS-rapport_2011_webb.pdf

Something that even this study hints to, if you read the entire article;

"Men and women from outside of Sweden and parents with a lower level of education were on average more positive to corporal punishment, than the others."
16:37 December 1, 2011 by star10
How frequently do Swedes on average visit/call their aging parents? I am not sanctioning abuse towards children. But there is a lot of attention to each detail about how parents deal with their children but very little focus on how grown-up children try to care about their elderly parents.
17:03 December 1, 2011 by lovedealer76
@star10

Good point mate
17:06 December 1, 2011 by alieninsweden
I just want to point out the historical inaccuracy of characterizing Europeans as 'native Swedes.' Saami are the true native Swedes... It's bizarre how this trope is continually invoked in various posts here, the opposition between native (Germanic) Swedes and 'immigrants.' The truth is, those considered natives invaded this country.
17:15 December 1, 2011 by calebian22
Stress is the reason for manhandling your kids? Jante friggin lagen! Feel stressed in life? Beat your kid, your spouse, or your dog. What goes on behind closed doors in Sweden, truly is a dirty little secret.
17:31 December 1, 2011 by Migga
@ calebian22

Sweden is the least tolerant against abusing children. If you worry about what goes on behind closed doors in Sweden then your head would explode thinking about closed doors anywhere else.
18:12 December 1, 2011 by Greekfan
You should NEVER shake anybody, it can be very dangerous. Beat, what exactly is meant by beat? I see no harm in the ossasional mild single slap on the back of the lower legs given after several warnings. I remember the, there is a slap coming, I can definitely see a slap, it's getting closer, it's almost here, routine. This usualy worked and said slap was only very rarely needed.
18:19 December 1, 2011 by calebian22
Migga,

Sweden is the least tolerant against abusing children? My butt. It just depends on your definition of abuse.
19:17 December 1, 2011 by Svensksmith
I agree, Greekfan. A well placed swat on the rump is a lot less dangerous than shaking a child which can damage their brains.
19:20 December 1, 2011 by Migga
@ calebian22

Read the rapport I linked. Swedens definition of abuse is one of the harshest. And abuse is frowned upon by the public. Not something you can say in the rest of the world where everyone just mind their own business even when abuse is obvious.

Take the case with the italian tourist this summer. The father slapped, pulled and lifted his son by the hair in the middle of the street. Abuse in Sweden, not abuse in Italy. Witnesses stepped up and contacted the police, the italian father was taken to jail. I`d say Sweden is the least tolerant to abuse of children.

http://www.thelocal.se/35982/20110906/

Feel free to read the comments to that article aswell, filled with people who like to flog their kids. No native Swedes tho.
19:57 December 1, 2011 by GLO
Does a kick in the pants count???? Its too late mine are 33/36.......
20:44 December 1, 2011 by Svensksmith
Mine, too. Well maybe 34/36 if I don't want to hold my breath.
21:51 December 1, 2011 by Douglas Garner
I think we could make a good case that putting up with children's bad behavior in public rather than correcting them, and allowing some children to blackmail their parents with threats that they will claim to have been mistreated is a far more harmful situation.

God knows I was beat enough as a child, and would not wish that on anyone, but the current Swedish situation just represents the other extreme and does not work either.
23:22 December 1, 2011 by rumcajs
Ok, define "grab". I have a 2.5 y/o son and he's got a loooot of attitude. I had to put him in the car, take him to his grandparents and then go to work..... and guess what: he didn't bloody want to use the belt!!!!

My options are: 1- Shout like a Death Metal "singer" and hope his gonna sit after all the people around look at you like if you were nuts.

2- "Grab" him, put him in the chair and hold hm till you fasten the belt hard enough so he can't perform some escapist trick (coz he can) and stand even more people looking at you with even worse ayes.

3- Be late and tell your boss that you are late everyday coz your son doesn't wanna get in the car and it's not acceptable to grab him. After some time get the sack and the same people that looked at me like if I was nuts would comment here that all those people without jobs are lazy parasits living from their taxed!!!!!

I never beat him or shake him, but if we don't GRAB'em............
23:56 December 1, 2011 by chantal11
It all comes down to parenting- you raise a respectful child... and you don't have to abuse them; a slap, a grab, a shake... it is all abuse.

Instead of beating your child you should use that effort towards correcting his/her behaviour. It is not there fault they are acting up- it is the parents fault.

You get the child you raise.

I think it is heartbreaking that a child is hit because their parent isn't putting in enough effort into how the child is raised.

It is pure laziness on behalf of the parents.
00:24 December 2, 2011 by CCVB
so what??? it has worked for hundreds of years and kids grew up having much more respect than the ones now who cant get a little smack once in a while and therefore think everything is allowed! Stupid that something that worked for centuries suddenly becomes illegal! RIDICULOUS!
01:01 December 2, 2011 by shiraz
All countries perhaps ought to avoid physical, psychic, spiritual and psychological abuse of any kind towards any lifeform. Unfortunately some communities are struggling with parents abusing children (leave along enemies or strangers).
01:10 December 2, 2011 by samson123
my parents slapped the crap out of me when i was growing up and i turned out just fine. still love my parents too.
01:23 December 2, 2011 by swenrika
It just sooo amazes me how laws can get so extreme.

Parents should be allowed to discipline their children. THEIR children. The family is the MOST important part of society and the law comes a few steps later, but this seems to be the reverse in so many instances.

Now don't get me wrong, I'm talking about the slap on the butt, sweet short sting on the butt and lesson learned, not a beating that the kid winds up in hospital, that , I agree, is a no no.

It is amazing to see how we humans learn so much from nature, have and still are, but somehow I do not see a Lion mom sweet talking, begging her cubs into behaving. But I do remember seeing them getting one mighty slap, and shortly after being cuddled, learn the lesson again, or grandparent and some of our parents knew them well, applied them well and here we are today, grown adults,

@CCVB #16

So agree, if disciplining your kids was so wrong, we all are a bunch of degraded misfits (well, the older ones amongst us) that are no use to society. But, strangely enough, we live, we love, we work, we have fun. And all after we got spanked a few times whilst being younger.
09:33 December 2, 2011 by Central European
Well the problem is that physical punishments are sometimes much less cruel than psychological violence which is not in generall feared by ministers for children and families and all "kids rights activists"

The adequate physical punishment is short quick response with clear contact to situation of children misbehaviour.

Many of alternative psychological punishements are bit thick, too long and do not drawe the lessons to kids.
13:45 December 2, 2011 by Internationalist
With regard to this article, I think discussion of whom, what race or nationality group harm their kids is nothing except escaping from the main purpose of this subject. We could

Researchers have been saying for 50 years that CORPORAL PUNISHMENT is not a good way to discipline children; it's painful and humiliating, and leads to resentment and revenge, not remorse or impulse control. Now for the first time, someone is saying it's even worse than we imagined: The more children are CORPORAL PUNISHED, the more likely they will grow up to be less successful academically, have unhappier marriages, earn less money, and live unhappier lives than children who are never spanked.

Hard to believe all that can come from a swift swat on the tush now and then, isn't it?

"Suppose there are two medicines that work, but one has harmful side effects that don't show up for 10 or 20 years. Even if one dose has only a tiny chance of an adverse effect, I think us parents would want to avoid that risk. That's the way we should think about spanking,". We can't argue that CORPORAL PUNISHMENT doesn't work, rather that other strategies work better and most probably don't have permanent side effect on our children.
20:38 December 2, 2011 by Tengo
By the way, what does the bible say? Which is worse. Physical abuse or psychological abuse, why is focus only on physical abuse? What about psychological abuse of students by their teachers? What about economical violence/abuse? Material violence (parents breaking things infront of their children)? Abuse can take many forms, there is no society that is spared from it. Just not talking to your children and walking away from a difficult situation at home or with your family can cause damages to your children. We shouldn't be so biased in our outlook, we should look at the problem for what it is instead of ethnicising it...
11:36 December 3, 2011 by Internationalist
Tengo: As you've addressed this entity has many underlying attributes. Therefore it seems at this article the writer and us commenters only fucus on physical abouse, level of it, efect and side effect ot it. Since children upbringing is one of the most important psychological subject we should analys it section by section and level by level. Generalisation normally does not result effective.
Today's headlines
Perspective: ‘Russian sub’ alert
Why a foreign vessel lurks in Swedish waters
The HMS Stockholm patrols Jungfrufjärden in the Stockholm archipelago on Monday morning. Photo: Anders Wiklund/TT

Why a foreign vessel lurks in Swedish waters

With Sweden engaged in its biggest domestic military operation since the Cold War, The Local spoke to Johan Wiktorin, a fellow at the Swedish Royal Academy of War Sciences, to get insight into what’s going on in the Stockholm archipelago. READ  

Over 20 Swedish flights hit by Lufthansa strike
Grounded Lufthansa planes. Photo: TT

Over 20 Swedish flights hit by Lufthansa strike

A strike by pilots at German airline Lufthansa will affect over 20 flights in and out of Sweden over the next two days. READ  

National
Dentist gives free care to Roma beggars
Photo: Shutterstock

Dentist gives free care to Roma beggars

A dentist in western Sweden is offering free dental care to his town's Roma begging population. READ  

Ebola crisis
Stockholm patient does not have Ebola
Infection clinic at Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge. Photo: Fredrik Sandberg/TT

Stockholm patient does not have Ebola

UPDATED: A patient at a Stockholm hospital was told on Monday morning that he does not have Ebola, after he was forced to spend the night in isolation. READ  

Business & Money
Electrolux profit soars after cost-cutting efforts
Photo: TT

Electrolux profit soars after cost-cutting efforts

Swedish electrical appliance maker Electrolux reported its third-quarter net profit soared 42 percent to 933 million kronor ($130 million) thanks to a cost-cutting programme started at the end of last year. READ  

National
School photographer fired for homophobic slur
Photo credit: Shutterstock

School photographer fired for homophobic slur

A photographer at a high school in southern Sweden was sacked after he called one of the students a "fag" during a shoot. READ  

Stockholm 'Russian sub' alert
No let-up in search for foreign vessel
Minehunter HMS Koster takes part in the search in the Stockholm archipelago on Sunday. Photo: Marko Säävälä/TT

No let-up in search for foreign vessel

A hunt for foreign underwater activity near Stockholm entered its fourth day on Monday as Sweden’s armed forces vowed to keep searching “day and night” for what media reports suggest may be a damaged Russian vessel. READ  

Ebola crisis
Patient in isolation after airport Ebola alert

Patient in isolation after airport Ebola alert

A male passenger who landed at Stockholm's Arlanda airport has been transferred to an isolation unit amid fears he may be suffering from the Ebola virus. But a specialist was keen to play down concerns. READ  

Stockholm 'Russian sub' alert
Pictured: 'suspicious object' off Swedish coast
Photo: Swedish Armed Forces

Pictured: 'suspicious object' off Swedish coast

Sweden’s Armed Forces have said it is likely a foreign power is conducting operations in Swedish waters, and have released pictures of a suspicious object seen in the Stockholm Archipelago. READ  

Stockholm 'Russian sub' alert
Mystery deepens over reported Russian sub
The HMS Visby combs the Stockholm archipelago on Sunday as the military operation continues. Photo: Marko Säävälä/TT

Mystery deepens over reported Russian sub

Mystery deepened on Sunday over a Swedish military operation triggered by "foreign underwater activity" off the coast of Stockholm, amid an unconfirmed report of a hunt for a damaged Russian submarine. READ  

RECEIVE OUR NEWSLETTER AND ALERTS
National
Sweden deploys troops over underwater threat
Gallery
People-watching: October 19th
TT
Society
QUIZ: How good is your Swedish?
Business & Money
Get your own office in Gothenburg or Stockholm - free for a day
National
A Touch of Scandinavia: Reindeer in the kitchen
Blog updates

19 October

Getting it (Blogweiser) »

"Follow Joel Sherwood on FB Few watch baseball in Sweden. This is excellent when your team loses..." READ »

 

17 October

Editor’s Blog, Oct 17th (The Local Sweden) »

"Hi readers, Here’s the whole week of news in just 60 seconds. The most-read story was about a..." READ »

 
 
 
Lifestyle
What's on in Sweden: October 17th - 24th
Society
The nudity... and nine other things expat men notice in Sweden
Gallery
People-watching: October 15th
Gallery
Your views: Should outdoor smoking be banned in Sweden?
Business & Money
Sweden has 'large hole' in finances
Sponsored Article
Introducing... Finding a job in Stockholm
Society
Monster salmon caught in northern Sweden
Gallery
Property of the week: Lorensberg
National
Scandinavia's child bride
National
Ebola crisis: How is Sweden preparing?
Lifestyle
Sweden's The Bridge to become 'more Danish'
Business & Money
How Sweden is becoming a cashless society
Gallery
Stockholm Burlesque Festival 2014
National
How a little red horse became a symbol for Sweden
Gallery
People-watching: October 12th
Business & Money
The hottest start-ups from southern Sweden
National
What's on in Sweden: October 10th - 17th
National
Stockholm is 'best' region for well-being
Gallery
People-watching: October 8th
National
Five facts to know about Patrick Modiano
Society
My Swedish Career: A French fashionista in Sweden
Society
Swede's anti-bully Facebook tale goes viral
Society
Have you seen Sweden's viral subway cancer campaign?
National
Isis: Swedes linked to Turkish prisoner swap
National
Should Swedes be banned from buying sex abroad?
Gallery
Fredrik Reinfeldt's leaving presents
National
Five Swedish TV shows you shouldn't miss
Gallery
A tool belt, a casserole, and a book. Fredrik Reinfeldt's parliament gifts
TT
Lifestyle
Top five winter festivals in Sweden
TT
National
Sami reindeer herders win mine reprieve
Gallery
Property of the Week: Gamla Enskede
Sponsored Article
How to catch the first lobster of the year
Politics
Ten new minister faces you should know
Tech
First womb transplant baby in world born in Sweden
Gallery
People-watching: October 5th
National
What's on in Sweden
National
Sweden rethinks Afghan translators' protection
Society
Interview with Geena Davis: 'I want to be in a Swedish movie'
Gallery
Stefan Löfven through the years
Gallery
People-watching: October 1st
Team SCA
Sponsored Article
All-female SCA team takes off on Volvo Ocean Race
Latest news from The Local in Austria

More news from Austria at thelocal.at

Latest news from The Local in Switzerland

More news from Switzerland at thelocal.ch

Latest news from The Local in Germany

More news from Germany at thelocal.de

Latest news from The Local in Denmark

More news from Denmark at thelocal.dk

Latest news from The Local in Spain

More news from Spain at thelocal.es

Latest news from The Local in France

More news from France at thelocal.fr

Latest news from The Local in Italy

More news from Italy at thelocal.it

Latest news from The Local in Norway

More news from Norway at thelocal.no

984
jobs available
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions is an innovative business company which provides valuable assistance with the Swedish Authorities, Swedish language practice and general communications. Call 073-100 47 81 or visit:
www.swedishdowntown.com
PSD Media
PSD Media is marketing company that offers innovative solutions for online retailers. We provide modern solutions that help increase traffic and raise conversion. Visit our site at:
http://psdmedia.se
If you want to drink, that’s your business.
If you want to stop, we can help.

Learn more about English-language Alcoholics Anonymous in Sweden. No dues. No fees. Confidentiality assured.
AA-EUROPE.ORG/SWEDEN