• Sweden edition
 
Sweden budget bill sparks heated debate

Sweden budget bill sparks heated debate

Published: 20 Sep 2012 15:59 GMT+02:00
Updated: 20 Sep 2012 15:59 GMT+02:00

"We're presenting this year's budget proposal in very uncertain times. But with this budget, Sweden will have perhaps the strongest finances in Europe," Borg told reporters during a morning press conference.

"The budget includes long-term, necessary investments. But the starting point is that we're in a tough situation. We have countries like Greece, Spain, and Italy that give reasons for great concern."

The government announced reforms totalling 22.7 billion kronor ($3.47 billion) aimed at stimulating growth and employment next year, including investments in infrastructure, research and development, and programmes to improve job opportunities for young people.

It also plans to cut the corporate tax rate from 26.3 to 22 percent to improve prospects for new jobs and investment.

Borg lamented that Europe would likely grow at no more than one percent in the coming decade, but added that Sweden is well-equipped to weather the persistent economic slowdown.

"Even if the Swedish economy grinds to a halt, if the global economy stops, we have room to implement needed measures," said Borg.

Borg said he expected Sweden's strong economic growth rate -- 3.9 percent in 2011 -- to slow in 2012 but maintained his forecast of 1.6 percent this year, 2.7 percent next year, and 3.7 percent for 2014.

He added that Sweden, which has in recent years presented a balanced or surplus budget, can expect a deficit of 0.3 percent of gross domestic product this year and 0.6 percent next year, before returning to a slight surplus of 0.3 percent in 2014.

The country is also in the enviable position of having a falling debt level: in 2011 it had public debt of 38.4 percent of GDP, which is expected to fall to 37.7 percent in 2012, 36.9 percent in 2013 and 34.7 percent in 2014.

"We have much higher growth numbers than the rest of Europe. And we haven't had any unpleasant surprises in our public finances," he said.

The government also expects unemployment to drop from 7.5 percent next year to 6.7 percent in 2014.

According to the government's calculations, the budget will add 0.4 percent to GDP growth in 2014 as well as 17,000 jobs.

In presenting the budget at the Riksdag, Borg painted a picture of the Swedish economy as being "a little better" than other countries when it came to growth, employment, and public debt.

However, the opposition was quick to pounce on the minister, with Social Democrat Fredrik Olovsson grilling Borg about the government's decision to scrap the goal of maintaining a budget surplus.

"That's been a strength of Sweden's that we've had a broad backing of this financial framework. Now the government's own expert agency has warned that policies aren't going to fulfill parts of that framework; that they won't reach the goal of maintaining a surplus," said Olovsson.

"You're not going to maintain a surplus, but you're still going ahead with a huge reduction in corporate taxes. Why?"

Borg refused to answer, however, instead launching a counterattack on the Social Democrats.

"We have Europe's strongest finances, stronger than Germany's, Finland's, the Netherlands' and Austria's. In that situation, when we take responsibility for protecting Sweden, investing in the future; when we choose infrastructure, research, corporate taxes; then Fredrik Olovsson says that's too much because they are too pessimistic and because they've already proposed everything," the minister responded.

"I don't think I've seen a more incoherent economic policy ever presented in this chamber. The only words that come to mind are political opportunism."

Meanwhile, the Green Party's Per Bolund slammed Borg for thinking more about the 2014 elections than the economic challenges facing Sweden.

"Anders Borg seems to be looking more at the election cycle than the business cycle," he said.

There was also plenty of criticism for Borg and the budget from outside the Riksdag chambers, with Social Democrat economic policy spokesperson Magdelana Andersson taking issue with the minister's employment forecast, which she argued was too optimistic.

"Anders Borg seems to be in a parallel universe; you could call it wishful thinking," she said.

She slammed the government's corporate tax cuts, expressing doubts as to whether the government would be able to keep Sweden's public finances in order.

Ulla Andersson of the Left Party said the budget showed that Borg and the government had "chosen sides".

"He's choosing by cutting corporate taxes and increasing big companies' profits instead of tackling unemployment," she said.

"In so doing, he's also rejected reforms that create jobs," she added, questioning whether lower corporate taxes would create more jobs as the government claims.

Union groups were also quick to express their displeasure over the 2013 budget.

Anders Ferbe, head of the IF Metall manufacturing union, argued the budget was "immoral and unacceptable" for not devoting any of the surplus funding to the ill and unemployed.

Karl-Petter Thorwaldsson, chair of trade union federation LO, also pointed to what he saw was a lack of measures to help combat unemployment.

"It's remarkable that the government doesn't take this opportunity to fight mass unemployment when 400,000 people are outside the labour market. The government's budget has huge deficiencies and isn't going to create the jobs we need," he said in a statement.

Business groups were more positive toward the government's budget, however, with Urban Bäckström, head of the Confederation of Swedish Enterprise (Svenskt näringsliv), praising the government's focus on reforms.

"Sweden needs more reforms that strengthen competitiveness and allow more ideas to be turned into profitable companies," he said in a statement.

"The government has taken several steps in the right direction."

Meanwhile Robert Berqvist, chief economist with the SEB bank, said the government's growth forecasts where "at the high end of the scale".

"His forecast is 2.7 percent and we're at about 1.5 percent. That's a big difference," Berqvist told the TT news agency.

TT/The Local/dl

Follow The Local on Twitter

Don't miss...X
Left Right

Your comments about this article

19:09 September 20, 2012 by Hisingen
Any good journalist should know that this sentence is not correct, and the word to have been used is FIGURES, not numbers.

"We have much higher growth numbers than the rest of Europe. . . ."

As to the content of the budget . as a pensioner I am staggered by the untold wealth that will eventually be coming my way. About 50SEK per month.

Wow, what shall I do with it all?????
20:29 September 20, 2012 by Abe L
I'm concerned about not taking serious steps to support consumer spending, most importantly through reduced income tax and/or lower VAT. That is what will be fuelling the economy the next couple of years to come.

I agree that it would have also been a better choice to spend some of the surplus on creating jobs and work. It would be in Sweden's interest to incorporate some legislations that make it more appealing to foreign companies. In a similar way Ireland, Luxembourg and Holland have done.
09:25 September 21, 2012 by Great Scott
This waffling buffoon keeps on about Sweden's economic strength, it's his answer to everything. The problem is, it's a lie and he continuingly spits this out to the Swedish public. He is playing with figures to suit himself, the words "strongest finances in Europe" are used by many finance ministers all over Europe. This is the only effort he works on as Sweden's finance minister, His doesn't see unemployment going through the roof, health care collapsing, poverty and crime rising. He doesn't want to answer questions outside of his little box. Once again this is a budget for the rich, he is looking after his own kind. He needs to go on one of these reality TV shows, where he can go to many places in Sweden and see for himself what it's really like outside of Stockholm. I think he might ask who the buffoon is running this country.
09:28 September 21, 2012 by micvau
This Swedish government seems to be living on cloud 9. Minister Borg you must be smoking some good Sh*t, because you're definitely away with the fairies with your futuristic financial predictions. You need to come back down to earth and start doing what's best for the Swedish working class. This following report sums up on how f''cked up the Swedish financial system really is.

Welcome to the modern Sweden and i hope you all now enjoy reading where your hard earned taxes are going to.

Fakta: Så mycket bidrag får invandrare.

Sedan etableringsreformen tradde i kraft får en nyanland arbetsløs invandramamma med tre barn foljande bidrag varge månad:-

6510 kr. etabieringsersattning

4500 kr. etableringstillagg

4500 kr bøstadsbidrag

3754 kr. barnbidrag

2546 kr. underhållsstød

= 21 810 kr i månaden skattefritt

Utøver detta har invandrare ratt till:

259 200 kr. i retroaktiv føraldrapenning.

12 000kr. skattefri SFI bonus.

Invandraren kan sjalv valja i vilken takt foraldrapengen ska betalas ut. SFI bonusen betalas ut vid avklarad kurs.

Inget av ovenstående bidrag kan dras in for att invandraren vagrar att ta ett erbjudet jobb.

KALLA: STATSKONTORET
Today's headlines
Elections 2014
'Sweden Democrats hold the key to elections'
Jimmie Åkesson. Photo: Bertil Ericson/TT

'Sweden Democrats hold the key to elections'

With national elections around the corner, political scientist Stig-Björn Ljunggren says there's a hive of activity behind the scenes, and that the right-wing nationalist party could end up being the key player. READ  

Swedish artist jailed for 'race hate' pictures
Police arrested Dan Park (pictured) and confiscated his art works at an exhibition opening on July 5th. Photo: Drago Prvulovic/TT

Swedish artist jailed for 'race hate' pictures

A Malmö court has sentenced Swedish street artist Dan Park to six months in jail for incitement to racial agitation and defamation. READ  

Sweden Floods
Flooding closes roads in central Sweden
Photo: TT

Flooding closes roads in central Sweden

UPDATED: Sections of the highway in Värmland have been closed off due to flooding, and several trains are standing still. Authorities say the situation will get worse before it gets better. READ  

Elections 2014
Sweden elections: How do they work?
Casting a vote. Photo: Shutterstock

Sweden elections: How do they work?

National, regional, and local elections are taking place in Sweden on September 14th. Whether you're a first-time voter or a fresh armchair observer, The Local's beginners' guide will answer the key questions you were too afraid to ask. READ  

Sweden orders textbook on Roma discrimination
A Romani language class in Malmö. Photo: Drago Prvulovic/TT

Sweden orders textbook on Roma discrimination

The Swedish government has asked a new commission to create school materials based on a white paper documenting Swedish discrimination of Roma. READ  

Day-care rapist
Day-care rape suspect 'was mentally ill'
Photo: TT

Day-care rape suspect 'was mentally ill'

Social services have ruled that a day-care intern charged with molesting 14 children in southern Sweden was "seriously mentally disturbed". READ  

What's On in Sweden

What's On in Sweden

Autumn has arrived in Sweden, which means grey skies are approaching. But summer goes out with a skip, hop, and a bang - the annual Color Run is taking place in Stockholm this weekend. READ  

Surströmmingspremiär
Swedes celebrate first day of smelly fish season
Photo: Hasse Holmberg/TT

Swedes celebrate first day of smelly fish season

On the third Thursday of each August, Swedes celebrate the start of the fermented herring season. The Local finds out more about the worst-smelling food on earth, and collects some of the best reaction videos. READ  

Spotify founders win 'Expats of the Year'
Crown Princess Victoria and Spotify co-founder Martin Lorentzon Photo: Fredrik Sandberg/TT

Spotify founders win 'Expats of the Year'

Spotify founders Martin Lorentzon and Daniel Ek won the International Swede of the Year award (Årets svensk i världen) on Wednesday for their work in making the world's music accessible to the world. READ  

Top ministers count cost of 'less secure world'
Photo: Maja Suslin/TT

Top ministers count cost of 'less secure world'

Foreign and Finance Ministers Carl Bildt and Anders Borg held a press conference on Wednesday to discuss how Sweden was being affected by a "less secure" world, and how it would foot the bill for a growing influx of refugees. READ  

RECEIVE OUR NEWSLETTER AND ALERTS
Finest.se
Gallery
People-watching August 20th
Society
Did you know the Bronx in NYC was named after a Swede?
Politics
"Iraq reminds me of the Yugoslav wars. It's the same story."
Society
Swedes slam Danes for 'racist' art
National
Majority of Swedes favour more or just as many refugees
Blog updates

17 August

Sea Fever (Around Sweden in a kayak) »

"I’m going to keep this post short and sweet as its not something I take any pleasure in writing. After much deliberation I have made the heartbreaking decision to abandon my trip after 1200km due to reoccurring injury. It is not a decision I have made lightly and it is one that has been truly devastating..." READ »

 

17 August

St. Louis strong (Blogweiser) »

"It’s typically a bad sign when my hometown makes news in Sweden. St. Louis was in the headlines here a few years ago when a tornado struck the airport. The city also caught attention after a politician talked about ‘legitimate rape’. Now, shooting and riots this week in Ferguson, a part of St. Louis, are..." READ »

 
 
 
Society
Lock your bathrooms: Swedish toilet invader on the the loose
Politics
'Assange will not leave until safe'
Gallery
See more images from the southern Sweden floods
Sponsored Article
Find out what gives this Swedish school executive appeal
Society
Serial chicken smuggler caught at Norway border. Again.
Society
This gold coin may be the key to solving a Swedish massacre
Shutterstock
Lifestyle
The Swedish mentor (and why you may need one)
National
Food agency warns girls: 'Don't eat stinky fish'
Politics
Reinfeldt calls for tolerance to refugees
Gallery
People-watching August 16-17
National
Sweden celebrates 200 years of peace
Society
Top ten literal Swedish words
Politics
'Terror training should be illegal': Liberal Party
Gallery
Swedes talk about 200 years of national peace
Politics
Islamic extremist shakes Sweden with TV threat
National
Teacher fined for 'Hitler salute' in German class
National
Swede asks for epidural and gets disinfectant
Features
Kiruna residents talk life in a town on the move
National
Swedish dad takes kids to Israel to learn about war
Skatteverket
Sponsored Article
Introducing... ID cards and permits in Stockholm
Sponsored Article
Introducing...Your finances in Stockholm
Sponsored Article
Introducing...Housing in Stockholm
Latest news from The Local in Austria

More news from Austria at thelocal.at

Latest news from The Local in Switzerland

More news from Switzerland at thelocal.ch

Latest news from The Local in Germany

More news from Germany at thelocal.de

Latest news from The Local in Denmark

More news from Denmark at thelocal.dk

Latest news from The Local in Spain

More news from Spain at thelocal.es

Latest news from The Local in France

More news from France at thelocal.fr

Latest news from The Local in Italy

More news from Italy at thelocal.it

Latest news from The Local in Norway

More news from Norway at thelocal.no

697
jobs available
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions
Swedish Down Town Consulting & Productions is an innovative business company which provides valuable assistance with the Swedish Authorities, Swedish language practice and general communications. Call 073-100 47 81 or visit:
www.swedishdowntown.com
PSD Media
PSD Media is marketing company that offers innovative solutions for online retailers. We provide modern solutions that help increase traffic and raise conversion. Visit our site at:
http://psdmedia.se