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Skeleton lover walks free as bone trial ends

The Local · 30 Nov 2012, 16:39

Published: 30 Nov 2012 16:39 GMT+01:00

The woman, whose collection of bones has made headlines around the world, was arrested in September when police arrived at her apartment and found human skeletons and knives after responding to a call about gunfire coming from the flat.

She was charged with violating the peace of the dead after confiscated images and witness statements suggested she used the bones for sexual purposes.

On Friday, the 37-year-old walked free following three days of hearings in the Gothenburg District Court, which will now begin deliberations ahead of a verdict expected to be delivered on December 17th.

While no longer being held on remand, the woman remains suspected of the crimes with which she has been charged.

“It’s in no way remarkable that she has been released,” prosecutor Kristina Ehrenborg-Staffas told the Expressen newspaper.

The 37-year-old, who denies having committed any crime, smiled and waved at onlookers as she left the courtroom, according to Expressen.

Investigators have confirmed that 397 bones, 15 skulls, and 13 teeth that were found in the woman's house are indeed human remains.

The woman’s defence lawyer Annika Stanislaus claimed that the witness testimony used by prosecutors was based on nonsense.

“Witness testimony about sexual activities with the skeleton parts is based on second-hand information which have been shown to be nothing more than drunken rants,” Stanislaus said during her final appeal, according to the paper.

“Our understanding is that the whole prosecution has tried to show my client as an immoral and horrible person."

In closing statements, however, the prosecutor restated that the crime was much more serious.

“She has been a necrophile for many years and this is really about a sex crime,” Ehrenborg-Staffas explained, who has called for the woman to be jailed.

A preliminary psychiatric investigation showed the woman does not suffer from any mental illness.

If found guilty, the woman faces a maximum of two years in prison.

TT/The Local/og

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Your comments about this article

18:11 November 30, 2012 by jmclewis
Oh just give the dog a bone.
18:26 November 30, 2012 by KingArthur
Maybe her skeleton in the closet had 207 bones :)
20:10 November 30, 2012 by Enjoyourlife
It is no suprise that more than 150 skeletons were stolen from a cemetary in Benin.
20:17 November 30, 2012 by Svensksmith
♬ Bone freeee....
21:59 November 30, 2012 by theobserver
It is really peculiar to see this kind of reaction in Sweden, a country where bestiality is legal, but where prostitution is illegal. So much obsession with sex and sexual practices. It seems that Swedes now want to control sex the same way they control alcohol. Is this a totalitarian country or what?

The woman had bones in her apartment. She may or may not have used them as sex toys. Why does the state care? The question, if any, should be: has she obtained the bones legally? If so, then the state should buzz off. None of their business. Of not, then the woman should be charged with illegally acquiring human bones.

If the woman's apartment had dildos and other sex toys instead of bones, would the police care?

Sweden is a country where Eugenics (google it) continued until 1975, i.e. long after Hitler was gone. Perhaps their obsession to sex(ual intolerance) is much deeper than we think...

The funny thing is that the rest of the world thinks of Sweden as a sexually liberated society. If only they knew the truth!
13:33 December 1, 2012 by procrustes
#5 Sweden has always officially been extremely repressive with respect to sex, which is why it has the reputation of being libertine. The normal reaction of humans when fundamental body-rights are abridged is to resist, often in an extreme manner. An excellent example was Sweden's leadership in soft child porn during the 1970s and Swedish movies showing extreme (for the times) nude and sex scenes.

The question is always: who owns your body? You? God? State? For a long time in Sweden the answer was God and State. Now it's just the State. Some fine day wise politicians will realize that certain freedoms are beyond their right to control.

As to the Bone Prosecutor--who appoints these people? This loon should be thrown out on her ear. Do Prosecutors have to have a law degree? Do they have to be sentient?
00:26 December 2, 2012 by theobserver

intereresting. but why do you think this is the case?
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