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Eco-conscious Swedes in hen house trend

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Chickens photo: Shutterstock.
11:32 CEST+02:00
Fresh eggs from the hen house at the bottom of the garden is the latest eco-friendly fad being pursued by Swedish urbanites ready to run the risk of a little neighbourhood friction to keep their Saturday pancakes organic.
"The number of people keeping hens is increasing dramatically," said Jan-Olof Mathiasson at Svenska Lanthönsklubben, an organization representing the interests of countryside chickens in Sweden.
 
The trend is not limited to the countryside, however, with the inhabitants of Sweden's towns and cities also keen on a fresh egg.
 
"Many people are applying to keep hens in town. Families with children want to be able to go into their own little hen house house and pluck an egg or two to show the children where the food comes from," Mathiasson added.
 
Mathiasson explained that the garden hen trend is part of a wider push for more organic produce.
 
"It is the same as with organic food, you want to know what you're putting in your mouth."
 
The increasing popularity of keeping chickens at home comes with a downside, however, with the price of a few feathered friends increasing dramatically in recent months.
 
"People pay any price to get their hands on a breeding egg. There are fantasy figures being exchanged, nothing of the like have been seen in Sweden before," Mathiasson said.
 
A further potential obstacle for suburban residents is the close proximity, and relative power, of the neighbours.
 

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"You should check with the municipality. The neighbours are also very powerful. If there is a neighbour who does not like the crow of a rooster, you will almost certainly not be able to get one."
 
Jan-Olof Mathiasson expressed concerned that some families may not have properly thought through their purchase prior to acquiring their hens.
 
"The risk is that there will be lot of impulse buying. That people buy chickens in the summer, don't have anywhere to keep them when winter comes and will then have to remove them." 

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