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Green Party ranked 'most gay friendly' in Sweden

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12:40 CEST+02:00
The Green Party's views are 88.6 percent "LGBT-friendly", a Swedish LGBT rights group claimed on Monday, making the Greens the most gay-friendly of all Sweden's parliamentary parties.

The Swedish Federation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Rights (RFSL) conducted a survey investigating how closely the parliamentary parties of Sweden correspond with the organization's own views, for example same-sex adoption laws and anti-discrimination measures.

Scores were calculated based both on the politicians' answers and recent voting habits on LGBT questions.

The Green Party (Miljöpartiet, MP) came out as the clear leader, with more than an 88 percent match on queer questions. The Sweden Democrats party (Sverigedemokraterna) came in last, with just 15.2 percent agreeing with RFSL views.

Helena Leander, Green party spokeswoman on LGBT issues, found the results heartening.

"Of course it's fun, but it's also fundamental for our ideology of affirming diversity and all people's equal worth," Leander told newspaper Svenska Dagbladet.

"The Greens have never wanted all people to be fit one template. They should be free and able to shape their own lives without being limited by obsolete norms."

IN PICTURES: Stockholm Pride Parade 2012

The Pirate Party and Feministiskt Initiative also participated in the survey, although not part of the Swedish parliament. The Pirate Party (Piratpartiet) scored even higher than the Greens, with 91.3 percent similarity to RFSL. The Feminist Initiative (Feministiskt initiativ) came in third place, scoring 87.6.

The Left Party (Vänsterpartiet, V) also ranked highly with RFSL, with 86.5 percent agreement with their views.  The Alliance (Alliansen, the current governing parties of Sweden) lagged behind the Red-Greens, with the Liberal Party (Folkpartiet) at 65.9, Centre Party (Centerpartiet) at 59, the Moderates (Moderaterna) at 27, and the Christian Democrats (Kristdemokratenrna) at 21.7 percent.

Christian Democrat spokesman Johan Ingerö  didn't put much weight on the results.
 
"It's their survey and we respect that. We stand for all people's equal worth. And then of course everyone can take their own attitude about it," Ingerö told The Local.
 
Sweden Democrat Martin Kinnunen was more outspoken.
 
"I don't believe that homosexuals are hetereogenous in their political views," Kinnunen told The Local. 
 

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"I think it's wrong to assume that all homosexuals think the same way and put them in one group like this. They can decide for themselves what politics to vote for. We don't place any importance on people's sexual preferences, but it's wrong for an organization to stamp such a large group with how they should think."
 
The release of the results coincided with the annual Stockholm Pride festival, which kicked off on Monday. Stockholm Pride runs through August 2nd, with activities, seminars, concerts, and of course the Pride Parade - Scandinavia's largest. Eurovision winner Conchita Wurst will also be performing. 

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