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Papers: Stegö Chilò should resign too

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11:43 CEST+02:00
Just one day after Trade Minister Maria Borelius' resignation, Swedish leader pages are already demanding that Culture Minister Cecilia Stegö Chilò also resign.

Aftonbladet, owned by Social Democrat-union organization LO, said Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt would be failing his voters if Stegö Chilò was allowed to remain in her job. Liberal paper Göteborgs-Posten also demanded her resignation.

The minister has come under fire after it was revealed that she had not paid her television licence fee for up to 16 years. Her brief as culture minister gives her responsibility for public service broadcasting.

Aftonbladet's leader writer Åsa Petersen said the ministerial crises were due in part to ideological differences between different groups within the Moderates. The paper said that the party's attempt to rebrand itself as "Sweden's new workers' party" was "just talk."

It said that "those who for ideological reasons don't like laws on employment rights and tax have created a lifestyle for themselves in which they don't follow them."

PM Nilsson in Expressen, which is independent liberal, said that Maria Borelius actions were an example on non-existent morality over tax, as well as plain meanness. Expressen avoided the question of Stegö Chilò, saying that Borelius' resignation would allow the government to implement its all-important employment policies.

Malmö-based Sydsvenskan wrote that it had become impossible to keep Borelius in the government, but said that now the focus would move to Stegö Chilò. It also said that its local star, migration minister Tobias Billström, risked coming under pressure "for both consistently and for ideological reasons neglecting to pay his TV licence."

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