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Swedish prince inherits derelict country estate

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Swedish prince inherits derelict country estate
12:06 CEST+02:00
Sweden's Prince Carl-Philip has inherited a derelict country estate in Södermanland, south of Stockholm.

The Royal Court has confirmed rumours that have been circulating amongst neighbours in the village of Källvik in Södermanland, that Prince Carl Philip, second in line to the Swedish throne, has inherited the estate.

"Yes, the prince received the house in the will of the former owner," said Annika Sönnerberg at the Royal Court to local newspaper Södermanlands Nyheter.

Ökenäs estate dates from the middle of the 1800s and consists of a main manor house and assorted small buildings.

It has not yet been confirmed if the prince, who is currently pursuing a career as a racing driver, plans to join the landed gentry and move into the farm, but the prospect has excited locals nonetheless.

Barbro Nilsson who is the prince's closest neighbour told the newspaper about the former owner.

"He died last summer. He needed to give the farm away, he had neither a wife nor children," she said.

The estate is in a derelict state and has not been lived in for several years and renovations have been ongoing for some time according to Barbro Nilsson, whose father owned Ökenäs estate in the 1920s.

The surrounding land has not been cleared since the 1940s. The property is surrounded by such dense forests that it can not be seen from the water at Näsviken and barely from the nearest road. The property has a "no trespassing" sign at its entrance and the main buildings are surrounded by scaffolding and plastic sheeting.

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