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Euro support hits six-year high: poll

TT/The Local · 23 Jun 2009, 11:32

Published: 23 Jun 2009 11:32 GMT+02:00

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If a referendum on whether Sweden should introduce the euro had been held in May 2009, 43 percent of Swedes would have voted against it, while 42 percent would have voted in favour. The two sides have not been this close since the 2003 referendum, according to a poll by Statistics Sweden (SCB).

A noticeably larger number of men than women are positive towards the euro. Forty-seven percent of men would vote in the affirmative in a referendum, compared to 37 percent of women.

More women also report being unsure, with 17.5 percent answering “don't know”, compared to only 12.7 percent of men.

“I am not entirely surprised; the trend has been that the gap is closing. But if it's neck and neck in terms of public opinion, it's a stalemate politically,” said Cecilia Skingsley, chief analyst at Swedbank.

“In our view it's unlikely to come up even during the next term of government. There would have to be a long period of one or two years with a majority in favour of the euro for the politicians to change their position.”

The opposition parties do not want Sweden to hold a new referendum on the euro before the end of the next government term in 2014.

Their position was laid out in an opinion piece in Svenska Dagbladet on Tuesday regarding the Social Democratic, Green and Left parties' common position on what the government should do when it assumes the EU presidency next month.

They state that their position on a new referendum is quite clear.

Story continues below…

“We have the same opinion regarding the monetary union. A new referendum on introducing the euro should not be held between 2010-2014,” wrote Social Democrat leader Mona Sahlin, Green Party spokespersons Peter Eriksson and Maria Wetterstrand, and Left Party leader Lars Ohly.

“We respect the results of the referendum and the promises made during the 2003 election. The government must now begin to speak with a single voice on this issue,” they continue, pointing to the Liberals' call for a referendum within the next few years, and the Christian Democrats desire for a referendum during the next government term.

TT/The Local (news@thelocal.se)

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Your comments about this article

12:19 June 23, 2009 by justanotherexpat
Join, !!!! The exchange rates are absolutely killing our business at the moment..............and we're bleeding staff like no-one's business.............and the Swedes blame the foreigners......................even though the foreigners had no say in the matter when the referendum was taken......................but no responsibility is taken, it's easier to blame "the darkies what bought us up like!"

It's too easy to say in response, "Told you so!" But i say it anyway :p
13:31 June 23, 2009 by Staffs
The exchange rate is very favourable to Swedish exporters at the moment, and that is the basis of any society, produce more than one consumes.

Lose control of the currency and one loses control of life.

Look to the PIGS, Portugal, Irelands, Greece & Spain, and see what an uncontrollable and therefore inappropriate exchange rate has done for their economies. Ask them about the Euro.

The clamour for the Euro is international banker induced hysteria as a means to control everyone and everything. The governemnt supports joining because the government has been bought and paid for by the bankers.
13:37 June 23, 2009 by tigger007
your are right justanotherexpat in some of your comments!

if sweden gets the euro prices will go UP! like it did in finland and greece some people know this to be true. in a business stand point i do understand about the exchange rates,but on a social stand point it could be a wrong fit for sweden. the euro will bring it's good and bad points,but sweden needs to look at all aspects of the euro. i think sweden needs to review it's taxation and collective laws before the accept the euro,to make sure that the euro is good for sweden.
20:00 June 23, 2009 by Blackpoint
Staffs i´m a swede who live in portugal since kid...

The EURO was very possitive to portugal .. our economy is safer especialy with this financial crise moving on. Its true that prices raise up but was only in the first year, now everything was back to normal.

The swedish economy will be stronger and safer and swedes will travel with more money, with Euro. The krona is very low, and its true that benefits the exportations and tourism, but the others economy sectors are being a bad moment.

On the next referendum i will vote YES! :)
14:49 June 24, 2009 by Staffs

you are wrong, the Euro has not been beneficial to Portugal.

However, Portugal has benefited from the huge subsidies given to them by the 5 net contributors to the EU budget, who are: UK, Sweden, Germany, Denmark, Netherlands.

Yes, that's right everybody, every other nation in the EU takes money from these 5 nations, and we're not talking loose change, we're talking tens of billions.

Imagine what Sweden could do with the money is sends to Portugal and everyone else, more teachers, nurses, doctors, social housing, lower tax....
10:49 June 25, 2009 by ameribrit
Staffs, you need to crawl back into your cave. One of the reasons for the US having such an influence on global economics, both positive and negative, is that 50 separate states plus various other places around the world use a single unit of currency. The Euro zone is one of the things that strikes fear into the US Republicans because they understand the benefits and strengths that a truly united Europe will bring. They have even referred to it as "The United States of Europe", and acknowledge it as a threat to the US dollars dominance in the world market.

As for the arguments about exchange rates being better for Swedish companies that export goods, this only holds true if ALL of the components in the item being exported is sourced domestically .

I know you are going to go off on a rant about what a load of crap this is but I expect no less from a misguided concrete operating patriotic drone.
10:18 June 26, 2009 by Staffs

Thanks for your kind words.

I feel it necessary however to point out that the USA is bankrupt, morally as well as financially.

Unemployment, measured in U6, is 17.6%, the fiscal deficits amount to over $550000 per person and will only go higher due to the demographics of the baby boomers.

The answer is to default or to hyperinflate, or impoverish it's own people, in fact all options come down to the impoverishment of it's own people, it's just a matter of time, and that is also running out PDQ.
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