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Gaming software company offers golden job chance in Stockholm

Do you work in the software industry? Ever fancied working in one of the world’s online gaming hubs, with a great quality of life and a stimulating working environment? Now’s your chance.

Gaming software company offers golden job chance in Stockholm

Online gaming is big business in Stockholm. With many companies employing several thousand people, the Swedish capital is arguably the world’s most important centre for development of both betting software and other gaming products.

Stockholm-based NYX Interactive is a leading software supplier to the gaming industry. Clients include some of the biggest names in the industry, such as Swedish state betting company Svenska Spel, La Française de Jeux (the French state lottery), Bingolotto.se and Betsson.

Continuing its’ growth, the company is looking for new talent to join its team, including technical project managers, C++ programmers, flash developers, and database administrators.

Founded in 2006 by “a group of entrepreneurial IT guys with a background in finance,” NYX Interactive is working in a very exciting part of the market, says CEO David Flynn.

Flynn, a former VP of Swedish gaming technology company Ongame, argues that online gaming is one of the most stimulating parts of the software industry you could work in:

“It’s a very exciting part of the market – our clients have to be operational 24/7, with more transactions going through our systems than your average high street bank.

NYX Interactive is one of the younger companies in the sector in Stockholm, but is very fast moving. In Sweden alone, over 1.5 million people interact with the company’s games.

Flynn, who is British, says that people who want to work in the gaming industry could not do better than to move to Stockholm:

“If you’re in the industry or want to get into it, it’s the place to be.”

The strength of the industry has its roots in the bursting of the 2000 dotcom bubble, which led many entrepreneurs in Stockholm to look for new business opportunities.

“Sweden had the internet penetration and the gaming culture. Gaming is almost a national past-time. Svenska Spel reported that in 2010 over 4.5 million Swede’s purchased one particular branded scratchcard. That’s over half the population!” Flynn says.

The dynamic Stockholm business environment is reflected in NYX Interactive’s office, where everyone is given the chance to feel involved in all aspects of the business:

“We’ve got a very entrepreneurial atmosphere and a “can-do” approach,” says Flynn.

“On a weekly basis we get together as a company and run through everything we’re doing in the business, so that everyone is kept up to date,” he says.

The team at NYX Interactive is mostly Swedish, yet the office language is English, so foreigners joining the team have no trouble working with their colleagues. Speaking Swedish is certainly not a necessity – although most newcomers soon pick up a smattering. Flynn adds “The team works hard and plays hard together, we’ve had football games, pool tournaments, summer parties as well as informal socializing. We even had an indoor kubb game the other week.”

Flynn is keen to see people from outside Sweden apply for the latest jobs. He points out that apart from the professional advantages of working in the Stockholm gaming industry, there are also lots of other upsides. Not least the fact that Stockholm is one of Europe’s most livable cities, where pretty much everyone speaks excellent English.

“Moving to Sweden was pretty painless for me,” he says.

“The natural environment is amazing. In the winter you can go skiing and in the summer you can swim in the lakes or ride along many of the signed cycle routes – all while living in the capital city. It’s a pretty incredible opportunity,” he says.

To find out more about working for NYX Interactive, visit www.nyxinteractive.com

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READER QUESTIONS

Reader question: When am I eligible for a Swedish pension?

A reader got in touch to ask how long he had to work in Sweden before he was eligible for a pension. Here are Sweden's pension rules, and how you can get your pension when the time comes.

Reader question: When am I eligible for a Swedish pension?

The Swedish pension is part of the country’s social insurance system, and it can seem like a confusing beast at times. The good news is that if you’re living and working here, you’ll almost certainly be earning towards a pension, and you’ll be able to get that money even if you move elsewhere before retirement.

You will start earning your Swedish general pension, or allmän pension, once you’ve earned over 20,431 kronor in a single year, and – for almost all kinds of pension in Sweden – there is no time limit on how long you must have lived in Sweden before you are eligible.

The exception is the minimum guarantee pension, or garantipension, which you can receive whether you’ve worked or not. To be eligible at all for this, you need to have lived in Sweden for a period of at least three years before you are 65 years old. 

“There’s a limit, but it’s a money limit,” Johan Andersson, press secretary at the Swedish Pension Agency told The Local about the general pension. “When you reach the point that you start paying tax, you start paying into your pension.”

“But you have to apply for your pension, make sure you get in touch with us when you want to start receiving it,” he said.

Here’s our in-depth guide on how you can maximise your Swedish pension, even if you’re only planning on staying in Sweden short-term.

Those who spend only a few years working in Sweden will earn a much smaller pension than people who work here for their whole lives, but they are still entitled to something – people who have worked in Sweden will keep their income pension, premium pension, supplementary pension and occupational pension that they have earned in Sweden, even if they move to another country. The pension is paid no matter where in the world you live, but must be applied for – it is not automatically paid out at retirement age.

If you retire in the EU/EEA, or another country with which Sweden has a pension agreement, you just need to apply to the pension authority in your country of residence in order to start drawing your Swedish pension. If you live in a different country, you should contact the Swedish Pensions Agency for advice on accessing your pension, which is done by filling out a form (look for the form called Ansök om allmän pension – om du är bosatt utanför Sverige).

The agency recommends beginning the application process at least three months before you plan to take the pension, and ideally six months beforehand if you live abroad. It’s possible to have the pension paid into either a Swedish bank account or an account outside Sweden.

A guarantee pension – for those who live on a low income or no income while in Sweden – can be paid to those living in Sweden, an EU/EEA country, Switzerland or, in some cases, Canada. This is the only Swedish pension which is affected by how long you’ve lived in Sweden – you can only receive it if you’ve lived in the country for at least three years before the age of 65.

“The guarantee pension is residence based,” Andersson said. “But it’s lower if you haven’t lived in Sweden for at least 40 years. You are eligible for it after living in Sweden for only three years, but it won’t be that much.”

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