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New deal on rejected asylum seeker detention

TT/The Local/mh · 18 Nov 2011, 13:39

Published: 18 Nov 2011 13:39 GMT+01:00

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The agreement covers asylum seekers who won't leave Sweden freely after their application for asylum has been rejected.

According to migration minister Tobias Billström, the clear time limit is a positive development.

The initial limit of two months can be extended to twelve months, however.

In addition, the agreement also calls for travel restrictions for those that do not follow the existing rules requiring those who are denied asylum leave the country within 2 to 4 weeks.

“If you don't leave the country, then you will be denied re-entry as a sanction. That means that you are not allowed to re-enter Sweden or the rest of the Schengen area,” Billström told the TT news agency.

The agreement also includes provisions to ensure that the needs of children are given special attention during and after the asylum process.

“The authorities should make sure to consider the perspective of the children involved when taking certain measures, and this could have certain consequences. For example, you have the possibility to weigh special circumstances,” said Billström.

The motivation for these changes is a new EU Return Directive which Sweden is obliged to implement. Now that the Green Party is in agreement, the bill will be sent on to the Legislative Council.

The Directive sets out common terms for member states in dealing with people residing in the EU without a permit.

Specifically the Directive grants more leeway with cases involving children, specifying that their interests should be taken into account. According to the Green Party this opens the door for more favorable treatment for families.

“During these negotiations, the Green Party sought a Swedish application of the Directive which is as humane as possible,” Maria Ferm, the Green Party's migration issues spokesperson, told TT.

Story continues below…

The EU directive stipulates a travel ban of five years, but according to Maria Ferm the Green Party managed to lower the limit to one year for Sweden.

“We are against a re-entry ban, but it is something Sweden must introduce as a member of the EU. We have really pushed to make sure the time of the re-entry ban is as short as possible. It is positive that the suggested time, one year, is the shortest in the EU,” said Ferm.

The government and the Green Party began working together on migration issues after the 2010 elections.

TT/The Local/mh (news@thelocal.se)

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Your comments about this article

17:25 November 18, 2011 by Dazzler
Im struggling to understand why a person that is denied asylum, is deported, is allowed back at all. That just opens up the whole, wait out your time, come back and disappear off the radar into the Swedish countryside.
18:38 November 18, 2011 by jonathanjames61
I have a dream,one day there will be a very great calamity over Europe,and they will have to seek Asylum in Africa,you better treat us well or else history will judge you.Hope you see now European are asking Chinese to borrow money,who ever thought of this 20 years ago,or Portugal begging Angola to invest in their economy,Just wait and see that my prediction will come true.
19:39 November 18, 2011 by StuartM
It's time to put a stop to all deportations and all racist laws which penalise people based on the colour of their skin or what country they come from. Why should someone from say Iraq be treated any differently to an EU citizen like me who is allowed to stay in Sweden for as long as they like? It's racism pure and simple and has no place in a modern, civilised society.
21:10 November 18, 2011 by ROCKYF
I agree deport there asses for good and don't let them reenter , hy would you let them back in ,, most are just a drag on the welfare state , just as there are here in the USA
00:33 November 19, 2011 by Frobobbles
So a person that refuses to leave when denied asylum, gets a costly two months to one year detention and a costly deportation probably with a special hired airplane and then a 'reentry ban' that is lifted after one year...so the person can do it all over again? And these are the new 'strict' rules? How were the old rules?
12:25 November 19, 2011 by canuk
Deport people WITH prejudice! Take the rules back 20 years when Sweden started becoming a garbage dump with inferior people who in thousands of years could not get anything right in their own countries and instead want to move here to destroy this fantastic country.
16:44 November 19, 2011 by astra2thor6
Dear StuartM, An EU citizen can only remain in Sweden beyond 3 months if he/she can prove self-sufficiency to the Immigration Department, and certifies not to seek any type of social security, housing or any other monetary benefits from any Swedish government/kommun departments. The rules are quite strict for EU members, but invandrare seeking asylum can claim benefits from the Swedish state.
18:39 November 19, 2011 by StuartM
@ astra2thor6

I had no prove I was self-sufficient for my time here as a student but once you get the letter from Migrationsverket you can basically stay as long as you want since noone checks later to assume you still meet the requirements. I never had to say I wouldn't apply for benefits and I know that I would in fact be eligible for them if I found a job and started paying taxes.
15:40 November 20, 2011 by mafketis
In other news, 2500 "asylym seekers" living in Switzerland vacationed in the countries they were seeking asylum from.


I wonder how often that happens in Sweden (or if it would make a difference).

The problem in trying to do a nice thing (like grant asylum to those few who genuinely need it) is that it attracts herds of users and conmen hoping to game the system.

If you can travel back and forth you're not looking for asylum.
20:28 November 20, 2011 by yourkidding
@ canuk

I've met some great immigrants AND some inferior ones. I've met some great Swedes AND some inferior ones. Heres an Idea....lets deport the inferior Swedes right along side of the Inferior immigrants (or wannabe immigrants) and keep the superior ones. Now THAT would improve this great and glorious and superior (and a hoo and a ha) country and get rid of some of those "Svens" I see stumbling around the System Bolaget at opening time or waiting for THEIR social assistence. Just cus you're Swedish does NOT necessarily mean you are not a lazy, sponging ass. Du ha dem här också!
04:18 November 21, 2011 by kenfe
Having immigrants is like a two edged sword. But for Sweden the cons far out ways the pros .The culprit here ,i believe is not the immigrants .rather it is the state. The government should devise a system by which the potential of skilled immigrants could be analyzed and harnessed. No body knows how many PHDs and experienced professionals are scrubbing floors or simply staying on social welfare. i think the policies of the migration board should be rewritten . Australians provide good references.

It is funny when they cry about immigrants ,after leaving the air ports and the border ajar for illegal immigrants to slide in effortlessly.
21:15 January 29, 2012 by janeway
I can't see this reform as being beneficial for us or the asylum seekers. To have the latter living off us for up to a year, then get flown back to their original country on our money just to be let in for another sejour a year later, is crazy. And to discriminate against those without children is also far out. You know how many children some asylum seeking families have? 8, 9, 10 and more, sponging off taxmoney with barnbidrag and färdtjänst, disability checks and what-nots. And what about those that are allowed to stay? Some make a living out of staying in SFI for eternity.

I welcome people from anywhere that are willing to benefit this country and pay their part. Anyone that will adapt and assimilate to our rules and laws, while keeping their traditions in the family. Like many Swedes do while living abroad.

But spongers and those unwilling to take part in our society, can leave immediately without being catered to for months.
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