Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland
Advertisement

Swedes to lift 'silence' on Stockholm bomb probe

Share this article

08:38 CET+01:00
Sunday marks one year since a suicide bomber blew himself up on a Stockholm street and on Wednesday the prosecutor plans to hold what some terror experts believe is a long-overdue press conference on the status of the investigation.

Agnetha Hilding Qvarnström and the Security Service Säpo have to date been very restrictive in detailing the investigation into the attack perpetrated by Taimour Abdulwahab and his alleged accomplices.

According to a Scottish investigation into the role of a suspected accomplice, Nasserdine Menni, there was a network behind the attack.

The Scottish investigation has revealed how Menni and Abdulwahab had known each other since 2003 and planned the attack over the course of several years.

The Swedish investigation has hitherto yielded few public details.

Swedish terrorism expert Magnus Ranstorp has questioned whether it's appropriate for a year to pass the before Säpo gives its version about the events on Bryggargatan in central Stockholm and Abdulwahab's history.

"It is after all one of the most serious terrorist incidents that has occurred in Sweden," Ranstorp wrote in an op-ed in the Swedish newspaper Svenska Dagbladet (SvD).

Ranstorp predicted that there will be "a curtain of secrecy" when Säpo describes its investigative methods at Wednesday's press conference.

He argued that the Security Service would have benefited from being more open about the investigation, pointing out there are a number of issues of general interest which should be answered.

A cloak of privacy can at times appear to be counter-productive, he argued, contrasting the Swedish investigation with the more open attitude of the Danish and British secret services.

Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement

From our sponsors

The power of cooperation: the secret to Swedish success?

Is the Swedish approach to leadership really as special as people think? The Local asks a non-Swedish manager at telecom giant Ericsson for a frank appraisal of Swedes' so-called 'lagom' leadership style.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Jobs
Click here to start your job search
Advertisement
Advertisement

Popular articles

Advertisement
Advertisement