• Sweden's news in English

Gun laws may be tightened: minister

TT/The Local/rm · 4 Jan 2012, 10:40

Published: 04 Jan 2012 10:40 GMT+01:00

Facebook Twitter Google+ reddit

”The previous report didn't see a reason to change the law. I am not happy with that and we are looking into it at the moment,” Ask told news agency TT.

The Chairman for the Committee on Justice, Social Democrat Morgan Johansson, has been demanding that Ask does something about the situation.

"This is really scary. It is about time now that the fight against organized crime becomes a national responsibility. This is not a local or regional issue," he said.

"The National Police Board has to be given more resources. There is currently 30 police officers working with this case. We have proposed an additional 100 million kronor ($14.6 million), which would mean that 130 officers can work with these questions."

Johansson also suggests to increase penalties for illegal possession of firearms from six months to one year in prison, which would make the crime serious enough in the eyes of the law for police to be allowed to use phone surveillance to catch suspects.

Beatrice Ask agrees that the latest rise in violence in the region is very serious and she agrees with Johansson that this is a national problem. However, she is not interested in the reorganisation of the Swedish police.

”We have a number of incidents when people have been gunned down on the streets of Malmö. It is important to focus on that situation and the concern experienced by Malmö residents. It is the long term work that is my main objective,” she said to TT.

A proposition for tougher weapons legislation in Sweden may see the light of day as soon as this spring, according to Ask. However, she was not willing to elaborate on what this may entail.

Swedish criminologist Jerzy Sarnecki believes two things are crucial in order to regain control of the crime wave in Malmö.

Short term, the authorities need to combat the widespread use of illegal firearms, and long term he suggests efforts such as those being made in Södertälje south of Stockholm.

Story continues below…

"The community [in Södertälje] was totally right to put in large police resources, but also from the Tax Agency, the Social Insurance Agency and the Social Services Department. In Södertälje the situation, at least for the time being, has improved significantly."

Meanwhile, Malmö police are now receiving support from all over the country, according to local chief of police Eva Årestad.

”Malmö is Sweden's priority number one right now,” Årestad said to TT.

TT/The Local/rm (news@thelocal.se)

Facebook Twitter Google+ reddit

Your comments about this article

11:18 January 4, 2012 by mikewhite
The idiom in English is that laws are "tightened" - ie. made more restrictive.

Things that are metaphorically sharpened include 'wits', 'surveillance' and 'attention', also perhaps 'watchdog teeth' !
11:56 January 4, 2012 by blursd
Correct me if I'm wrong, but since when do criminals who would shoot people in the middle of street care about gun laws? You really think "tightening" gun laws is going to make one bit of difference to these people? I'm not saying everyone should have guns, but at the same time I hate to be the bearer of bad news ... if criminals want to get their hands on a gun they're going to find a way to do it ... regardless of how restrictive the laws on their possession may be.

News flash ... criminals don't care about laws.
12:01 January 4, 2012 by DAVID T
What's wrong with her face?
12:09 January 4, 2012 by SimonDMontfort
"criminals don't care about laws." - True, and it may well be that Swedish gun laws are already stringent.

Maybe a review needs to look at tackling a 'gun culture' among certain sectors of the community, and training specialist police units to deal with it (just for starters)

@ DAVID T - nothing wrong with her face: she's wondering how to answer a question Lol!
12:16 January 4, 2012 by KungsholmenGuy
@ blursd

Agree that criminals do not care about the law, but as stated in the article, a key provision is that the increase in the maximum penalty from 6 months to a year will permit the police to use secret phone surveillance to track criminals, and this should help reduce deaths from planned assassinations and planned armed robberies.

Criminals and idiots have lost all respect for the lives of the police as well. In the past few weeks there were two attempts to kill amred police officers with cars.

Increasing the number of police from 100 to 130 will simply add more targets. I woud use the budget for 30 extra police officers instead to hire 50 phone and internet surveillance people.
12:20 January 4, 2012 by Roy E
This is a classic case of treating a symptom of a problem in return for a false sense of security. But outside the imagination and in the real world, it's the criminals who benefit, confident that their law abiding victims are unable to adequately defend themselves.

Increasing the odds that a criminal will be successful is not the way to reduce crime. Future crime victims will have this naive minister to thank for their circumstance.
12:39 January 4, 2012 by flintis
This is what you get for letting all the INNOCENT refugees from war torn lands enter the country, you know, the ones who cannot prove their identity for various doubtful reason but have never ever committed so much as a sin.

There is even talk of a weapons amnesty, are they so naive to beleive these criminals will just handover their weapons??? The mind boggles.

Anyway, 5 down, if they keep it up Malmö will be a criminal free City by ?? no it won't because the naive morons keep letting in more INNOCENT refugees.
12:51 January 4, 2012 by GLO

Fools,Fools fools, Just look what your leaders have done to Sweden!!!!

guns dont kills or rob... Look at the person holding the gun... You need to change the laws at the people causing the All the problems...

You cant bring people into your home from Failed cultures and expect anything different....
18:53 January 5, 2012 by mikewhite
"What's wrong with her face? " - she watched too much Gordon Ramsay ... alternatively she is prone to the Swedish custom of going red in the sun every summer, without any SPF lotion.
12:36 January 6, 2012 by caxton
Good to see Swedish politicians are just as dumb as UK ones. The UK has even more restrictive gun law than Sweden (though Swedes have to sit tests, but we don't) - no self-loading rifles over .22 calibre, no pistols or revolvers. Laws brought in in haste in reaction to incidents that shouldn't have happened if the police hadn't been asleep on the job. Criminal use of firearms continues unabated of course.
Today's headlines
Dylan removes Nobel-mention from website
The American musician has more or less responded to the news with silence. Photo: Per Wahlberg

American singer-song writer Bob Dylan has removed any mention of him being named one of this year’s Nobel Prize laureates on his official website.

Refugee crisis
Asylum requests in Sweden down by 70 percent
Sweden's migration minister Morgan Johansson. Photo: Christine Olsson/TT

Sweden received 70 percent fewer requests for asylum in the period between January and September 2016 than it did during the same time last year, the country’s justice and migration minister Morgan Johansson has revealed.

The unique story of Stockholm's floating libraries
The Stockholm archipelago book boat. Photo: Roger Hill.

Writer Roger Hill details his journeys on the boats that carry books over Stockholm's waterways and to its most remote places.

Refugee crisis
Second Stockholm asylum centre fire in a week
The new incident follows a similar fire in Fagersjö last week (pictured). Photo: Johan Nilsson/TT

Police suspect arson in the blaze, as well as a similar incident which occurred last Sunday.

More misery for Ericsson as losses pile up
Ericsson interim CEO Jan Frykhammar presenting its third quarter results. Photo: Claudio Bresciani/TT

The bad news just keeps coming from the Swedish telecoms giant.

Facebook 'sorry' for removing Swedish cancer video
A computer displaying Facebook's landing page. Photo: Christine Olsson/TT

The social media giant had censored a video explaining how women should check for suspicious lumps in their breasts.

Watch this amazing footage of Sweden’s landscapes
A still from the aerial footage of Sweden. Photo: Nate Summer-Cook

The spectacular drone footage captures both Sweden's south and the opposite extreme, thousands of kilometres north.

Sweden could be allowed to keep border controls: EU
Police ID checks at Hyllie station in southern Sweden. Photo: Stig-Åke Jönsson/TT

Sweden could be allowed to keep ID controls on its border with Denmark beyond the current end date of November, following discussions among EU leaders in Brussels last night.

Why women in Sweden will work for free by November
File photo of a woman working in a Swedish office. Photo: Anders Willund/TT

A new study into the gender pay gap suggests Sweden still has some work to do.

Look familiar? Meet your jawbone's ancestor
Thank God for evolution, eh?

There's something fishy about the human jawbone – it has its origins in the placodermi, a jowly species of fish that lived 400 million years ago, Swedish and Chinese researchers say.

Sponsored Article
This is Malmö: Football capital of Sweden
Fury at plans that 'threaten the IB's survival' in Sweden
Sponsored Article
Where is the Swedish music industry heading?
Here's where it could snow in central Sweden this weekend
Analysis & Opinion
Are we just going to let half the country die?
Blog updates

6 October

10 useful hjälpverb (The Swedish Teacher) »

"Hej! I think the so-called “hjalpverb” (auxiliary verbs in English) are a good way to get…" READ »


8 July

Editor’s blog, July 8th (The Local Sweden) »

"Hej readers, It has, as always, been a bizarre, serious and hilarious week in Sweden. You…" READ »

Sponsored Article
7 reasons you should join Sweden's 'a-kassa'
Angry elk chases Swede up a lamp post
Sponsored Article
Why you should 'grab a chair' on Stockholm's tech scene
The Local Voices
'Alienation in Sweden feels better: I find myself a stranger among scores of aliens'
People-watching: October 20th
The Local Voices
A layover at Qatar airport brought this Swedish-Kenyan couple together - now they're heading for marriage
Sponsored Article
Stockholm: creating solutions to global challenges
Swede punches clown that scared his grandmother
Sponsored Article
Swedish for programmers: 'It changed my life'
Fans throw flares and enter pitch in Swedish football riot
Could Swedish blood test solve 'Making a Murderer'?
Sponsored Article
Top 7 tips to help you learn Swedish
Property of the week: Linnéstaden, Gothenburg
Sponsored Article
How to vote absentee from abroad in the US elections
Swedish school to build gender neutral changing room
People-watching: October 14th-16th
Sponsored Article
'There was no future for me in Turkey'
Man in Sweden assaulted by clowns with broken bottle
Sponsored Article
‘Extremism can't be defeated on the battlefield alone’
Nobel Prize 2016: Literature
Sponsored Article
Stockholm: creating solutions to global challenges
Watch the man who discovered Bob Dylan react to his Nobel Prize win
Sponsored Article
Why you should 'grab a chair' on Stockholm's tech scene
Record numbers emigrating from Sweden
Sponsored Article
'There was no future for me in Turkey'
People-watching: October 12th
Sponsored Article
Where is the Swedish music industry heading?
The Local Voices
'Swedish startups should embrace newcomers' talents - there's nothing to fear'
Sponsored Article
Last chance to vote absentee in the US elections
How far right are the Sweden Democrats?
Property of the week: Triangeln, Malmö
Sweden unveils Europe's first elk hut
People-watching: October 7th-9th
The Local Voices
Syria's White Helmets: The Nobel Peace Prize would have meant a lot, but pulling a child from rubble is the greatest reward
Missing rune stone turns up in Sweden
Nobel Prize 2016: Chemistry
jobs available