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DISCRIMINATION

Guide dog not a hot ticket to disability bash

A partially-sighted Swedish woman was barred from a disability conference because another attendee was allergic to her guide dog, but has retaliated by reporting the incident to Sweden's Equality Ombudsman (Diskrimineringsombudsmannen).

Guide dog not a hot ticket to disability bash

The conference, dubbed Today’s Disabilities, was organized in early November 2012 by the National Board of Health and Welfare (Socialstyrelsen).

“They said I couldn’t attend because a woman at the conference was allergic to dogs,” the woman wrote in her complaint.

The woman, who also suffers chronic pain, said event organizers had previously said it was fine to bring the dog with her.

The standard form used to submit reports to the Ombudsman asks what the nature of the would-be-discrimination is. The woman chose not to tick any of the boxes available – gender, ethnicty, age, religion or even disability – and instead wrote:

“There is a huge lack of knowledge about allergies; myths and ignorance have been allowed to become ‘true’ without anyone looking at the facts.”

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CRIME

Police in Sweden block Danish extremist’s new demo

Police in western Sweden have rejected an appeal by the Danish extremist Rasmus Paludan against a decision to deny him permission for a Koran-burning protest in Borås.

Police in Sweden block Danish extremist's new demo

“Rasmus Paludan has a rhetoric which is intended to create disorder and chaos,” Emelie Kullmyr, the police officer in charge of protecting this year’s General Election in Western Sweden, said in a press release.

“We have seen how the public has been exposed to serious danger and police officers have been injured. The task of the police is to ensure security and we will do that, but all positive forces need to be helped to maintain peace and order.” 

In the press release, the police emphasised the importance of the public’s right to demonstrate and express their opinions freely, but said that the right to hold public demonstrations could still be curtailed in “exceptional cases”. 

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Paludan, who aimed to hold the demonstration on April 29th, can now appeal the police’s decision at the local civil court in Borås. 

He has now applied to hold on May 1st rallies in Uppsala and Stockholm for his far-right party Stram Kurs, or “Hard Line”. 

Koran-burning demonstrations held over the Easter holidays in the cities of Norrköping, Linköping, Malmö, Örebro, and in the Stockholm suburb of Rinkeby, led to the worst riots Sweden has seen in decades, with 100 police officers injured.

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