Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland
Advertisement

Sweden set for youngest parliament

Share this article

Sweden set for youngest parliament
Gustav Fridolin, 31, is the Green Party co-spokesperson. Photo: TT
09:24 CEST+02:00
The average age of Sweden's members of parliament is now 45, according to statistics released on Thursday. It is a record low for Sweden and five years below the global average.
Following national elections on September 14, figures released by Statistics Sweden show that Sweden's parliamentary members are on average two years younger than they were after the 2010 elections, when the average was 43.
 
"This is the youngest parliament ever in the history of Sweden's democracy," election statistician Richard Öhrvall told the TT news agency. 
 
Sweden has seen the age of its politicians dropping steadily over the past few decades. Back in 1991, the average was over 50. 
 
In 2014, the party with the youngest average age is the nationalist Sweden Democrats. Over one in three of its politicians are under the age of 35, with 39 the average age for elected representatives.

 
Sweden Democrats leader Jimmie Åkesson is 35 years old. Photo: TT

How the Sweden Democrats went mainstream

The worldwide average is 50 years old. 
 
Sweden's largest party, the Social Democrats, has an average MP age of 47.
 
This makes them the oldest political group in the Riksdag and contradicts with their election promise to ensure 25 percent of its MPs are below the age of 35.
 
Currently only 16 percent of its national politicians are under 35.
 
Party Secretary for the Social Democrats Carain Jämtin said the party had taken "a clear step" but that there was still work to be done. 
 
In the last election, the Social Democrats were significantly older, with just 9 percent under the age of 35. 
 
Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement

From our sponsors

The power of cooperation: the secret to Swedish success?

Is the Swedish approach to leadership really as special as people think? The Local asks a non-Swedish manager at telecom giant Ericsson for a frank appraisal of Swedes' so-called 'lagom' leadership style.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Jobs
Click here to start your job search
Advertisement
Advertisement

Popular articles

Advertisement
Advertisement