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Flights banned during Swedish royal wedding

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Flights banned during Swedish royal wedding
The flight ban, which covers much of central Stockholm, is from 12pm to 8pm. Photo: Eric Kilby/Flickr
10:43 CEST+02:00
A flight ban will be imposed over much of central Stockholm on Saturday when Prince Carl Philip weds Sofia Hellqvist.

The ban, which is set to run from 12pm to 8pm, applies to airplanes and helicopters as well as drones (remote-controlled pilotless aircraft) and model airplanes, according to Sweden's Transport Agency.

The only aircraft permitted to fly over the area will be police, air ambulances, the Swedish military, customs, search and rescue flights, and selected flights to and from Stockholm's Bromma and Arlanda airports.

The prohibited zone includes the entire Old Town, and other areas close to the city centre including parts of Södermalm, Norrmalm and Vasastan.

IN PICTURES: Prince Carl Philip and fiancee Sofia Hellqvist

Saturday's Royal Wedding is set to be a grand affair.

A legally-binding church service will take place in the Royal Chapel at the Royal Palace in Stockholm, starting at 4.30pm, followed by a horse and carriage procession around the city.

The wedding will be officiated by the King’s Chaplain Lars-Göran Lönnermark and Pastor Michael Bjerkhagen, who were also present at the wedding of Princess Madeleine and Christopher O’Neill, who married two years ago in the same church.

In the evening, Swedish DJ Avicii and duo Icona Pop are set to perform for the wedding guests following a lavish banquet.

SEE ALSO: Seven totally Swedish wedding traditions

“I met Carl Philip in Ibiza, where we got to hang out and talk for some time. He is so damn cool and a really good guy, actually. Humble,” Avicii recently told Swedish radio station NRJ.

Speaking earlier this week, Hellqvist admitted that the couple was experiencing pre-wedding jitters.

"We are very excited. And a little tense," she told Swedish broadcaster TV4.
 

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