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Seven ridiculous reasons to avoid visiting Sweden

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Seven ridiculous reasons to avoid visiting Sweden
Could polar bears (only found in Swedish zoos) and state-run alcohol stores put people off Sweden? Photos: Jonathan Haglund/Fredrik Sandberg/TT
13:54 CEST+02:00
After Sweden's anti-immigration party announced it planned to put off refugees with adverts in foreign media, Swedes rushed to Twitter to make fun of the idea. Here's our pick of their jokes.

Sweden Democrat leader Jimmie Åkesson explained the rather obvious fact that it will soon be "winter" and "cold" in the Nordic nation this week as he announced a new global advertising campaign designed to persuade refugees not to travel to the Nordic nation.

The move followed his party's controversial decision to put up posters on Stockholm's subway in (badly written) English over the summer, apologizing for foreign beggars in the city.

We're well aware that the global refugee crisis presents a serious problem for Europe. Sweden's government has vowed to help as many asylum seekers as possible, but resources are stretched as it continues to take in record numbers of new arrivals.

But putting the political complexities to one side, here are seven of the silliest reactions to the latest campaign by the Sweden Democrats. They've been tweeted out by some seriously funny Swedes, who we suspect might be making fun of the nationalists by using their own dubious Swenglish.

1. Too much snow and slush (snöslask)

2. State-run alcohol stores (which are closed on Sundays)

3. Below par Nordic Noir

4. Roaming polar bears (isbjörnar - not found in Sweden)

5. Communal laundry rooms (tvättstuga)

6. Midsummer parties (midsommarfest)

7. Sweden's football manager Erik Hamrén

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