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Refugees in bus protest accept new forest homes

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Refugees in bus protest accept new forest homes
The refugees on Thursday. Photo: Nisse Schmidt/TT
16:58 CET+01:00
UPDATED: Most of the asylum seekers who were refusing to move into a holiday village in west Sweden have accepted their new temporary homes, Swedish officials have confirmed.
Fourteen refugees had said that they were scared about living in the holiday park, which is in a remote area surrounded by forest, close to the Norwegian border.
 
They refused to get off the buses that delivered to them to the park over the weekend and had been sleeping inside one of them since Sunday.
 
On Thursday, Swedish Migration Board (Migrationsverket) officials said that most of the group had agreed to enter the holiday park and that the bus company would be able to collect its vehicles.
 
"I have spoken with the Swedish Migration Board. I'm going to move in here. I do not want to cause problems," one of the protestors, Ahmad Assas, told the TT news agency.
 
But he added: "I'm afraid of the dark. It is only the forest here. There are no shops, no pharmacy, no health care."
 
"We have heard so much good about Sweden, and we are really grateful for all the help. But we are angry at the Swedish Migration Board, they lied to us about where we were going," he continued.
 
As The Local reported on Wednesday, Migrationsverket has admitted that some of its workers may not have provided enough information to refugees about where they were heading after they boarded their transportation from Stockholm.
 
A spokesperson for the government agency, Johanna Uhr, suggested that the refugees weren't aware that while the holiday park was in a forest, it was close to a town.
 
"It was dark so they probably didn't think they were passing a school and shops and stuff and that's why they are scared and we understand this," she said.
 
Her comments were echoed by Maria Löfgren, head of for Migrationsverket for the Dalarna region, on Thursday.
 
"We must take this to heart and try to provide better information on what to expect. It is difficult, but we must do it," she told TT.
 
Löfgren added that there had been a lot of international attention on the refugees' relocation.
 
"Foreign media have shown great interest, I have spoken with several today."
 
By 5pm it remained unclear where two familes who were still refusing to sleep at the holiday park would be staying.
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