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Where are property prices rising in Sweden?

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Where are property prices rising in Sweden?
Boden in northern Sweden. Photo: Johan Elisson/Wikimedia
17:29 CEST+02:00
Property prices have rocketed in Sweden in the past year. This is where they're rising the fastest.

Property agents Svensk Fastighetsförmedling analysed statistics by number-crunching real estate agency Mäklarstatistik to find out where in Sweden property prices have risen the most since summer 2010.

It examined the number of so-called bostadsrätter (a type of housing ownership common in Sweden) sold in municipalities where at least 100 sales had been made, which meant that 103 of Sweden's 290 council areas formed part of the final report.

Stockholm is often the focus of discussions about property prices in Sweden, where an acute housing shortage is believed to be driving prices upwards, and the report found that prices in the greater area of the capital had gone up by a huge 57 percent in the past six years.

But it also noted that Gothenburg on the west coast had seen a sharper price rise (61 percent) than Stockholm, with Sweden's third-biggest city Malmö trailing behind the two at 29 percent.

Prices went up the most in Boden in the Norrbotten region of northern Sweden, with a bostadsrätt now costing 181 percent more than it would have done six years ago. Trollhättan in western Sweden came in second place, with a price rise of 119 percent, followed by Kristinehamn at 117 percent.

"Property prices are rising across the country and Norrland is no exception. The two universities in Luleå and Umeå are attracting more and more students which means supply can't keep up with increasing demand," said Jörgen Lundgren of Svensk Fastighetsförmedling's Umeå office.

"Boden's incredible percentage price rise can be explained by its proximity to Luleå, because when prices in the bigger towns go up it often affects the surrounding towns," he added.

However, in real term prices are still by far the highest in the capital.  A bostadsrätt currently costs on average 4,072,170 kronor ($484,543) in Stockholm, compared to 2,699,197 kronor in Gothenburg, 1,621,623 in Malmö and 620,987 kronor in Boden.

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