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This is what Sweden's new Icehotel looks like

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This is what Sweden's new Icehotel looks like
An artist's impression of the hotel in winter. Photo: PinPin Studio/Icehotel
10:12 CET+01:00
The famous Icehotel in Jukkasjärvi has just opened its new year-round section. Have a look at some of the first pictures of one of the world's most unusual hotels here.

The Icehotel in Jukkasjärvi near Kiruna is famous the world over, but while previous incarnations of the building have been allowed to melt before being completely remodeled and rebuilt each year, this month marks the launch of a new permanent section, Icehotel 365, which will be open year-round.


The entrance of the ice art hall. Photo: Asaf Kliger/Icehotel

The structure of the building is held up by pillars, but the walls and ceiling are made from around 1000 cubic metres of 'snice', a mix of snow and ice. We didn't come up with the name, don't blame us.


Deluxe Suite 365 – Don't get Lost. Design Tommy Alatalo. Photo: Asaf Kliger/Icehotel

The interior temperature is around -5C in summer and autumn, thanks to built-in chilling tubes in the ceiling, powered by solar power harnessed when the sun never sets during the northern summer months.


Deluxe Suite 365 – Kiss. Design Kestutis and Vytautas Musteikis. Photo Asaf Kliger/Icehotel

Some 25 artists and architects were involved in decorating the rooms.


Anyone for a frosty cocktail? Design Luc Voisin and Mathieu Brison. Photo: Asaf Kliger/Icehotel

Icehotel 365 boasts nine deluxe suites – each with their own sauna – as well as its own ice bar and ice gallery. We'll have that drink on the rocks, please.


"Honey, I think that deer is looking at us." Photo: Asaf Kliger/Icehotel

Around 50,000 guests from all over the world visit the classic Icehotel every year.

It is not everyone's cup of tea though. One furious visitor once commented on TripAdvisor that it was far too cold. If only there had been some sort of clue in the name.


Design Ulrika Tallving and Carl Wellander. Photo: Asaf Kliger/Icehotel


Dancers in the Dark. Design Tjåsa Gusfors and Patrick Dallard. Photo: Asaf Kliger/Icehotel

The village of Jukkasjärvi is located around 200 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle.


An artist's impression of what it would look like in summer. Photo: PinPin Studio/Icehotel

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