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Swedish recipe: how to make raspberry coulis

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Swedish recipe: how to make raspberry coulis
Drizzle the coulis over desserts. Photo: John Duxbury/Swedish Food
15:38 CEST+02:00
Food writer John Duxbury shares one of his favourite recipes with The Local.

Halloncoulis (raspberry coulis) is extremely easy to make and is well worth the effort as it tastes so much better than most ready-prepared versions out of a bottle. It can be kept for 4-5 days in a fridge or it can be frozen.

Raspberry coulis goes well with so many desserts or it can be drizzled over ice cream. I particularly like some with a slice of sockerkaka (Swedish sponge cake), fresh berries and lightly whipped cream. Gorgeous.

Summary

Makes: about 1/2 pint

Level: very easy

Preparation: 5 minutes

Cooking: 5 minutes

Total: 10 minutes

Tips

- This version is slightly sharp, which is how I like it. Add more sugar if desired.

-  Serve the coulis straight from the fridge so that it isn't too runny.

- Usually the coulis is drizzled over desserts, but it can be very nice poured round a dessert, going particularly well with individual lemon tarts.

Ingredients

250g (2 cups) raspberries

1 tbsp icing (powder/confectioner's) sugar, or taste

1 tbsp lemon juice, or to taste

Method

1. Pick over the raspberries to remove any stalks or insects.

2. Place all the ingredients in a large frying pan and warm gently until the sugar has all melted and the raspberries are beginning to break up and release their juice.

3. Pass the mixture through a sieve to remove the pips.

4. Stir thoroughly, leave to cool and then store in a fridge until required.

Recipe courtesy of John Duxbury, editor of Swedish Food.

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