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Spring is here in southern Sweden

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Spring is here in southern Sweden
People in Malmö were sunning themselves outside on Saturday. Photo: Johan Nilsson/TT
14:25 CET+01:00
Spring has almost certainly sprung as southern Sweden enjoys "out-of-the-ordinary" temperatures of up to 13C.
On a normal February day in southern Sweden, the average temperature is around zero. On Saturday, several places saw temperatures more than ten degrees higher. 
 
"It's out of the ordinary," SMHI metereologist Marie Staerk told the TT newswire. "It's not every year you get this warm air coming up over Sweden, and to get two-figures in the middle of February is unusual."  
 
In Sweden, spring officially starts on the first day on or after February 15 after which the average diurnal temperature remains above freezing for seven days in a row. The first of the seven days is counted as the first day of spring. 
 
So if the average temperature in any part of Sweden remains above freezing between February 15 and February 22, as is likely to be the case in the south of the country, spring will have come on Friday, February 15.  
 
"It looks extremely promising," Staerk's colleague Alexandra Ohlsson told the Ystads Allehande newspaper on Friday. 
 
"It might go down towards zero one night, but the day temperatures are now so high that they'll balance that out. The likelihood that we'll be able to say in a week that spring started today is extremely high." 
 
 
In Malmö, people were out  in parks and other public places on Saturday enjoying the first sun of the season.
 
A skateboarder enjoys the year's first sunshine. Photo: Johan Nilsson. 
 
 Others posted pictures of the first spring flowers on social media. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

VÅR i Skåne!!! ❤️❤️❤️ #vår #snödroppar #spring #vårtecken #äntligen

A post shared by Jennie (@jenniewallden) on

 
 
 
 
 
In Sweden, spring officially starts on the first day on or after February 15 after which the average diurnal temperature remains above freezing for seven days in a row. The first of the seven days is counted as the first day of spring. 
 
So if the average temperature in any part of Sweden remains above freezing between February 15 and February 22, as is likely to be the case in the south of the country, spring will have come on Friday, February 15.  
 

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