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RECALL

Organic baby drink recalled in Sweden after plant growth regulator detected

Swedish baby food producer Semper has recalled an organic apple and pear baby drink after the company found high levels of a chlorine-based straw shortening agent in the beverage.

Organic baby drink recalled in Sweden after plant growth regulator detected
Photo: Semper/TT

The substance, chlormequat, was found to be at a level above what is permitted for baby food but below the regulated maximum for fruit, according to Semper.

Straw shortening agents are used to reduce the growth of branches and straws so they can bear the weight of fruit, Semper quality control engineer Ann Kemperman told TT.

But the agent should not be found at all in an organic product.

“It may have been blown in from other orchards or have come from groundwater. We will investigate this,” Kemperman said, adding that children who have already consumed the affected drink are not at risk of adverse reactions.

The recall applies to all apple and pear baby drinks with ‘best before’ dates of February 22nd, 2020.

Consumers are advised to return the product to stores, where a refund will be given.

READ ALSO: Lethal listeria outbreak prompts food recall in Sweden

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CARS

Volvo recalls thousands of cars worldwide

Car maker Volvo is recalling 8,200 cars around the world because of potentially faulty airbags.

Volvo recalls thousands of cars worldwide
A Volvo V90 being prepared for a commercial shoot. Photo: Jonas Ekströmer/TT

The recall affects 1,200 cars sold in Sweden, including the new Volvo V90 series, and 7,000 cars sold abroad, reports the Expressen tabloid.

Volvo's supplier and business partner for its self-driving cars, Autoliv, alerted Volvo to a faulty airbag trigger and advised it to recall those cars that had it installed.

“The had a quality problem during a certain period of production. It could happen that there are problems when the airbag is to be deployed,” a Volvo Cars spokesperson told Expressen.

No known incidents or accidents have been reported in relation to the airbags.

Last autumn Volvo recalled 127,000 of its vehicles after a separate fault causing the air conditioning to leak water, which could cause the airbags to malfunction, was discovered.