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Winter's return causes confusion

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Winter's return causes confusion
09:22 CEST+02:00
Heavy snow falls were seen in many parts of northern Sweden on Saturday as winter made a comeback. Forecasts indicate however that this should be the last snow of the season.

The snow falls caused widespread power cuts.

"I am just heading out to shovel the snow, it's feels a little tough. I measured this morning and 24 centimetres of snow had fallen during the morning," said Evelyn Nykvist in Sörskog in Dalarna to news agency TT.

The snow falls covered much of Dalarna, inner Hälsingland, Härjedalen and up towards Jämtland and the ski resort of Åre. Swedish meteorological agency SMHI reported that 14-15 centimetres of snow fell in Leksand, Malung and Rättvik in Dalarna.

"It has snowed quite a lot, as far south as parts of Värmland. Further south than that the snow turns into slush," said SMHI meteorologist Sten Laurin.

Many residents in the affected areas have suffered confusion in May as one day they cycle to work and the next have to rummage around in their attics to dig out winter clothes, hats and gloves.

Svealand (the central region of the three regions that makes up Sweden) has not seen snow in May since 2005. Forecasts indicate that this will be the last of the season's snow.

Theres was some chaos on the roads as many motorists had already switched to summer tyres. Several cars slid off roads in the Falun-Borlänge area.

"But there have not been any accident involving injuries to people," said Christer Nelefelt at Dalarna police.

Several thousand households were without electricity in parts of Svealand as the heavy, wet snow weighed down power lines on Saturday morning. Problems persisted for many into the afternoon.

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