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Prison for prosecutor bomb attack

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Prison for prosecutor bomb attack
14:23 CEST+02:00
Two men suspected of planting a bomb which exploded on the front steps of prosecutor Barbro Jönsson’s home were found guilty on Wednesday and each sentenced to three and a half years in prison.

The two men from Malmö, Arabzadeh Mohammad Abadi, 25, and Moayed Abedi, 24, were convicted of devastation endangering the public as well as threatening a public servant.

The two men were also ordered to pay 158,000 kronor ($18,800) in damages and interest to Jönsson, who has since moved and transferred to a new job that also involves prosecuting gang crime.

Prosecutor Urban Svenkvist argued that the two placed the bomb on orders from the Brödraskapet Wolfpack (‘Wolfpack Brotherhood’) criminal gang.

Jönsson had been involved in several cases tied to the gang prior to the bombing.

When the bomb ripped apart her front door if her home in Trollhättan in western Sweden in November 2007, she was set to charge six men, all of whom had ties to Brödraskapet Wolfpack.

On her way to work at the time of the blast, Jönsson was not injured in the attack.

The charges were being filed in connection with a shooting at the apartment of a witness who had dared to testify against the gang.

The primary suspect in the witness shooting was eventually sentenced to five and a half years in prison.

The bombing of Jönsson's home received a great deal of media attention in Sweden, where it is seen as an attack against democratic values and a sign of the rise in organized crime in the country.

The prosecutor in the case withdrew the charge of attemped murder after it was proven that Ahad and Ashkan had ensured that Jönsson had left her home before they set off the bomb.

He had called for eight years in prison for the accused.

Defence lawyers for the two men said they planned to appeal the verdict.

Gang crimes are on the rise in southern Sweden and neighbouring Denmark.

According to media, there are around 1,000 active gang members in Sweden.

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