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Swede proves you can teach a reindeer new tricks

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Swede proves you can teach a reindeer new tricks
Ulika Andreasson and her reindeer frost at last year's Sweden International Horse Show at Friends Arena in Stockholm. Photo: Janerik Henriksson/TT
11:23 CEST+02:00
They might look like ordinary reindeer, but Frost and Rudolf are brimming with fancy tricks.

When not hanging out in a field in Kluk, northern Sweden, Rudolf likes to kiss people and show off his high-step moves, while Frost can sometimes be found hopping over fences with horses when he's not busy pulling sleighs. 

Ulrika Andreasson has taught them everything they know. 

“I've always wanted to work with training animals, especially for films,” she told The Local. 

“And I wanted to live in the middle of Norrland but there are already lots of people training dogs so I needed to find my own niche.” 

Training reindeer to do tricks is about as niche as it gets. So whenever filmmakers need reindeer actors, Rudolf and Frost have pretty much cornered the market. 


Photo: Janerik Henriksson/TT

Andreasson has had Rudolf for four years, while Frost joined the reindeer acting academy a year later. 

“They're the best of friends. They live together in a big fenced-off area and have everything a reindeer could need,” she said. 

And with Christmas fast approaching, they won't be short of work. 

“We usually travel around to markets and take part in company events.” 

But first, Ulrika Andreasson will take one of the reindeer to a major horse show in Stockholm, almost 600 kilometres south of the village where they live. 

“Last year the theme was Frozen, based on the animated film. This year it's a surprise.” 

Here's Ulrika Andreasson giving a TED talk with one of her reindeer.

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