Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland
Advertisement

Five ways to see the world from Sweden this weekend

Share this article

Five ways to see the world from Sweden this weekend
Never experienced a flamenco tabloa? You can do so from the heart of Stockholm. Photo: Victor R. Caivano/AP
06:59 CET+01:00
The winter days are growing darker and many Swedes will no doubt currently be planning a break to more exotic shores. Not everyone can manage to jet off to Thailand of course, but fear not, even if you can't pull off a vacation, there are a number of ways to give your mind a bit of a break and experience something more international in Sweden this weekend.

1. Warm up with some Flamenco

Flamenco is perhaps the defining element of Andalusian culture, where song, dance and frantic guitar playing meet in the ultimate form of southern Spanish expression that's a far cry from the typically reserved Swedish experience.

Anyone longing for some southern heat in Sweden's capital is in luck this weekend, as FlamencoFriday unfolds at the Pygméteatern near Odenplan in central Stockholm. The event's house band will be joined by both local and international artists over the course of more than five hours of flamenco from 17:45 onwards on Friday. If you're keen, this weekend's event is the last one until mid-December, so it's worth making the effort. Tickets and more information are available here.

2. Immerse yourself in the lights and sounds of India

Gothenburg's skies will light up this Sunday as the Chalmers Indian Association holds its Indian Cultural Night to celebrate Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights. A mixture of dance and music performances will be followed with a fireworks display then the all important Indian cuisine, and the evening promises to be an all-encompassing experience that will provide as authentic an Indian feel as you are likely to find in Sweden.

The event is being held at the Chalmers University student union building, just a 10 minute tram ride (or 30 minute walk) away from Gothenburg Central Station. The main run of tickets is now sold out, but check the official Facebook page for any late returns.


Children celebrating Diwali in India. Photo: Rafiq Maqbool/AP

3. Sample salsa in southern Sweden

Even southern Sweden can feel a touch grey at this time of the year, so why not let your mind wander to another continent with some high-tempo salsa?

Malmö's Club Salsa Royale will inject some energy into the city this Saturday from 21:00, starting with a few lessons for beginners before the real dancing kicks off. Whether you've always wanted to try the Latin American-inspired dance form, or you already have some experience, it should be a colourful night. Tickets and more information are available here.


Costumes optional. Photo: Francisco Seco/AP

4. Journey across Europe through film

Northern Sweden's biggest city will take on a distinctly international flavour next week as the Umeå European Film Festival kicks off. The program works to highlight films from and about different European countries, and in 2016 Poland and Spain in particular are being featured.

Along with an abundance of screenings, there will also be talks from the directors, providing a perfect opportunity to gain insight into film making in other European lands. The program and ticket information can be found here.

5. See a remnant of ancient Syria

Stockholm's Medelhavsmuseet (Museum of Mediterranean and Near Eastern Antiquities) is currently displaying ancient tomb sculptures from the city of Palmyra in Syria, an oasis that has been inhabited since prehistoric times and is estimated to have once boasted a population of up to 200,000 during the height of its days as a trading hub.

Palmyra came under the control of Isis in 2015, who destroyed several of its monuments before the area was taken back by the Syrian army, so the exhibition is an important opportunity to learn about the vast history and unique culture of a part of the world where many historic sites are under threat.

More information on the exhibition can be found here. Entrance to the museum is free.


Palmyra's Roman Theatre. Photo: STR/AP

Check out our interactive calendar below for more things to do in Sweden.

 

 
Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Jobs
Click here to start your job search
Advertisement
Advertisement

Popular articles

Advertisement
Advertisement