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Swedish royal palace is haunted, Queen Silvia says

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Swedish royal palace is haunted, Queen Silvia says
Haunted? Queen Silvia thinks so. Photo: Jonas Ekströmer/TT & Henrik Montgomery/TT
10:43 CET+01:00
Few buildings are better suited to a ghost story than castles and palaces, and it seems the queen of Sweden has experienced that first hand, as she admitted in a new documentary that she believes Stockholm's centuries old Drottningholm Palace is haunted.

First built in the 1600s, the palace on Lovön island in the Swedish capital is on Unesco’s World Heritage list, and the King and Queen of Sweden still live there. But not alone, according to Queen Silvia.

“There’s a lot of history here. There are also little friends… the ghosts. They’re all very friendly, but you sometimes feel like you aren’t alone. Come and feel it for yourself, go around here when it is dark and the like. It’s very exciting,” Queen Silvia told a new SVT documentary about the building.

Spending decades in old buildings apparently toughens a person up, as the Queen claims she isn't in the least bit scared of her co-inhabitants from the afterlife, who she says she has personally been in the presence of.

“You don’t get scared, it’s as friendly as there is. Imagine what they could tell?” the 73-year-old noted.

READ ALSO: Five spooky spots in haunted Sweden

Other Swedish royals share her suspicions. King Carl XVI Gustaf’s sister, Princess Christina, also believes that the palace is haunted.

“Of course it is. There are ghosts in all old houses. Definitely. There’s a lot of energy in that house and it would be strange if it didn’t express itself in the form of sounds and shapes. In all old houses there are stories of ghosts,” she said in the same programme.

Brave amateur ghost hunters can attempt to meet the palace’s mysterious otherworldly visitors for themselves: Drottningholm Palace is open to the public year round, with the exception of the rooms in the southern wing, which are reserved for the royals. And their spooky friends, presumably.

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